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Straight 57 Nomad

Show off your work! Anything from final results to full start-to-finish project journals.



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Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 3:58 pm
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:46 am
I'm doing this car for a good friend and it was actually in very good shape (rust wise), but the 1/4s were just about destroyed. It almost seemed like some little old lady kept the car in one of those single car garages with the small door, and rubbed her way in and out of the garage. I would have also replaced the right side door, but I was able to save it. The car only has 112,000 miles on it, and it is all original, with A/C, PS, PB, and I'm adding original looking PW.

000_3824.jpg



No Turning Back
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 3:58 pm
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 8:24 am
Like I said I'm new here, and I'm still trying to figure out how to do these pictures, I hope this works. These are for the 1/4 panel section being welded in and planished

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The repair on the rear of the same 1/4 panel

[img][IMG]http://i747.photobucket.com/albums/xx119/from7/Nomad/000_3498-1-1-1.jpg[/img][/img][img][IMG]
http://i747.photobucket.com/albums/xx11 ... -1-1-1.jpg[/img]

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And the tail pan repair



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Last edited by chevman on Mon Jun 27, 2011 9:46 am, edited 1 time in total.



No Turning Back
Posts: 938
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2004 4:19 pm
Location: Cowan Heights Ca
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2011 8:56 am
Great job on all those panels I know rust reconstruction requires a lot of time and patience, not to mention skill. :clap: :clap: Keep up the good work. :goodjob: :goodjob: That will be a beautiful car when done :happy: :happy: :happy:
it needs to be lowered with big and littles. .



No Turning Back
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 3:58 pm
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:03 am
Thanks for the comments, its good to know there are some who still have interest in metal work and finishing. I looked up your 38, and that was a good job you did on the roof. It took a lot courage to cut that top. You said you are just learning, but with the determination and skill that you are capable of, it just takes research, practice, and patience.



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Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 3:58 pm
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:23 am
Installing 1/4 panels

There was a problem with one 1/4 panel. I had done some welding on the front flange with a mig welder and didn't get good penatration, so with handling the panel so much on and off the car, the area cracked. I thought about just leaving it alone and bond it on the car, but I still needed to do more to it which involved more putting on and taking off. So with the panel clamped on the car and perfectly lined up, I spot welding some bracing to hold it in line.


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Then cut the mig weld area and made a patch. I like to round off the corners for less heat build up.


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And used the tig welder this time


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Each of the 1/4 panels were first treated with an acid, scrubbing it in with a wire brush to remove any sign of rust residue, then throughly rinsed with water, and washed with a bucket of hot water and soap, then rinsed again.

Epoxy primer was sprayed on before installing them on the car and sanded to make sure that there were no high spots that needed shrinking. Just trying to make sure those areas got cleaned and reprimed on the inside of the panel. I also wanted to be able to consistently remove and replace the panel, and have it line up the same each time, before permanently installing them.


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After sanding and making repairs, I reapplied the epoxy on the outside and this red oxide epoxy on the inside. With the 1/4 panel on the car, I marked where I could put the insulation without obstructing anything, and installed it off the car and then it was rolled flat.


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I used bonding adhesive instead of spot welding, and I have been doing everything I can to make sure that everything was just the way I wanted it, and all the trim fit the way I wanted it to, before attaching the 1/4s.
So all the prep work paid off, and I'm very pleased with it.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:58 am
What primers and top coat are you using....great Job!
Never argue with an idiot, he will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.



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Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 3:58 pm
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 10:09 am
The front fenders were next. I want to get everything mounted securely in front and behind the doors before I pull them off, because they are so hard to get lined up when the 1/4s and fenders have so much adjustment and are so easily moved.

The fenders have been cleaned, primed, and sanded the same way as the 1/4 panels.


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It took awhile to get the fender to fit on the car the same each time I tried. The problem turned out to be that the brace just wasn't flat enough where it bolts on to the body, so it could roll around and change the number of shims needed. But a flat washer solved that problem.


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Now that the 1/4s and fenders are solidly mounted, I have started working on the door gaps. The factory assembly manual shows the clearance should be from 1/16" to 3/16". With everything adjusted the way I want it, it leaves the gap at the hood to cowl, and hood to fender at just over 1/8". So I am shooting for that everywhere, in bare metal, and after painting it should be about 1/8 inch. Right in the middle of the factory tolerance.


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No Turning Back
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 3:58 pm
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 10:20 am
timbo wrote:What primers and top coat are you using....great Job!

Thanks Tim, I had a little PPG epoxy red oxide left over, so I'm using that on the inside. But the outside will be all SPI epoxy and PPG concept SS two tone yellow and white, covered with SPI universal clear. I plan to flatten the SS, and the clear, then a couple more coats of clear.

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Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2010 10:52 pm

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 10:34 am
The Rock wrote:
timbo wrote:What primers and top coat are you using....great Job!

Thanks Tim, I had a little PPG epoxy red oxide left over, so I'm using that on the inside. But the outside will be all SPI epoxy and PPG concept SS two tone yellow and white, covered with SPI universal clear. I plan to flatten the SS, and the clear, then a couple more coats of clear.

Why not go base/clear and lock down the first color with DBC 500? Plus one clear session is all you need with 3 coats clear. Especially with those colors. Keep up the good work. great pics...
Never argue with an idiot, he will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.



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Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 3:58 pm
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 10:42 am
I have done a lot of research, and come to the conclusion that SS is better for solid colors.
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