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1940 Ford 1/2 Ton Pickup Project

Show off your work! Anything from final results to full start-to-finish project journals.



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 2:59 pm
1940 Ford 1/2 Ton Pickup Project

I have posted a couple questions on this site and have had a couple of you suggest that I start a topic with my project. Here it is.

The first picture is of what the truck started as. I purchased it, brought it home, and tore it apart. Problem was, I didn't take enough pictures and didn't label any parts. I should mention that this was is my first restoration project and I have little automotive knowledge. Before this project I had only done things like change the oil and rotate tires.

I started out by working on the frame, suspension, and undercarriage components. You will see this in my other pictures. Now I am onto the body.

I plan on doing all the body work, welding in the floors, and even the painting (probably). Heres where I understand to start. CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG!!!

1. Strip down the cab, fenders, bed etc with a sandblaster ( as well as by hand)
2. Weld in floors
3. Filler - block - filler - block - filler- block.
4. Primer
5. Sand
6. Paint/clear
Attachments
P1020609.JPG
P1010580.JPG
P1000340.JPG
Truck Undercar.jpg
Truck Undercar.jpg (29.71 KiB) Viewed 2666 times
Turck Front.jpg

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 3:43 pm
1st looks like it's going to be an excellent project.
2nd, be careful with the sandblaster on the cab or any sheet metal. If not done right it will warp the metal. Different media is less damaging such a crushed walnut shells, etc. May want to practice on some scrap before putting to that cab.

Steve
1970, 350/200-4R, TPI, 373:1 Posi 12 bolt, Body Off In Progress
[IMG]http://i459.photobucket.com/albums/qq318/slaman37/100_7024.jpg[/IMG]

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 3:59 pm
Fortunately those older trucks are not too difficult to get back together.
Do you know what your final color is going to be?
I would try to do things in sections or steps beginning from the frame up. Once you get it stripped to bare metal you can cut out any rust and weld in your patches. At that point I would cover it in two coats of epoxy primer that way if you can't get back to it right away at least it is protected.
Be sure to keep your old floor sections and such for reference and dimensions. Many of the reproduction panels are not exact replacements and have to be tweaked, shaved, welded onto, etc. to get them right. You may also need to transfer straps, braces or other pieces from the old panels.
Take your time and get everything right and you'll have a great looking ride when done. :happy:
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:59 am
Hi 40 Ford

I just got done with a 41 Ford Tudor

That doesn't look like the original engine for a 40????

The Truck itself dont look to bad at all really, It should clean up nice.
DO NOT THROW any parts out for it no matter how trivial they may appear.
I was really surprised at how much wasn't available and/or was so expensive I had to reuse what I had.

I have been eyeing a 36 & a 38 Ford Truck both fairly complete but the owner and I havnt come to a deal yet.
Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:34 pm
The engine is not original. It is a replacement engine that was put in 1949-1953 cars and trucks. I have a 59ab block that was more appropriate but was too far damaged to put in. In the furture I want to install a 59ab but that is 10 plus years away. Thanks for your comments and help. Keep them coming.



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 8:32 pm
Thats a sweet little project



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:33 pm
So I just spent the last month moving from my one car garage to a new place that has a two car garage. YES!!! Actually took a bigger u-haul to move my garage than my enitre house. LOL.
DSCF0233.JPG
When first bought 4 years ago.
DSCF0233.JPG
When first bought 4 years ago.
Now that I have room, I am going to work on the body. You can see some of the pics above. Here are some additional pics. I have the cab on its back on a cart so I can sandblast the bottom and get some primer on it to see what I have. I need some advice on "securing" the cab so it wont flex. I need some pics/suggestions/advice on bracing the inside of the cab. I wonder if I need to do this as I am not going to take off the hole floor, just the toe boards and half the floor near the pedals. Let me know what you think.

Also, I could use a mentor. If anyone would like to help me in the body work process in kinda "telling" me what needs to be done or what is the best way to go by it please advise. My current worry is how to get the metal to bare metal and then how to protect it if I dont touch it in a couple months. Thanks for your time.
Attachments
P1040670.JPG
P1040667.JPG
P1040666.JPG
Current cab on back

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 1:48 pm
Media blasting is the best way to handle panels like that but they can be cleaned up by hand as well. Check out the 49 truck project for some pointers. viewtopic.php?f=12&t=16557
If you do not want to do it yourself check into some local shops but be sure to demand references. Also go to their website if they have one an look at reviews from customers. It is much nicer to have someone else do it (IMHO) if you can afford to and it will save you a bunch of time (maybe money too) in the long run. Media blasting is very time consuming, dirty, hot, sweaty work and makes a BIG mess so if you choose to do it yourself let us know so we can make some recommendations to help keep things contained.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 4:08 pm
Hey how's it going 40fordpu

I am also currently restoring a 41 pickup my grandfather gave when I was 11 been working on and off it ever since I am 24 navy Seabee construction mechanic and restoring cars runs in the family. I am by no means an expert but I love to read a lot of forums and whatnot, to seek out as much info as I can. currently I have my pickup in pieces in my garage frame on jack stands and the body is apart.

My cab is not as bad as yours but has it fair share of rust. I am having to do alot of rework that my grandfather did(skipping metal working steps with body filler) and find it also a pain in the butt to strip of the old paint and primer media blasting is a good method if you can find someone that knows what there doing for me I usual use a da mines an electric dewault and a wire wheel on a dewault grinder takes time but hey you don't have to shellcout the money to have it media blast( got a quote and for my cab it's between 250-500 bucks depending on how easy it comes off.) feel free to email me or call i can also share pics seems were about the same progress to one another I'm about to deploy early next year but when I come back the work begins



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 11:50 am
41ford... post some pics... would love to bounce ideas or questions off each other. Where you located?
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