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1940 Ford 1/2 Ton Pickup Project

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 9:52 pm
Yea I got tons of pics located in south Mississippi give me a couple days and I'll get some up



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 11:34 pm
So after moving, starting a new job and volunteer coaching in my area, I finally get some time to work on my truck. I have started to work on the cab using my sandblaster. I do not see much distortion in the metal and have come across only a couple pin holes that go to the other side.

I am in the process of purchasing reproduction sheet metal for the cab and bed. While I am doing that and finishing sandblasting I need to move on to the next steps. Here is where I am a total newbie and will be asking questions. Please fill in the blanks.

Buy materials, tools, and research. (Any suggestions on a list of proper tools? Good places to buy online?)

I understand that I should use a primer after sandblasting until I can replace the sheetmetal. (Q1. I believe epoxy primer is the best? Why? I have heard suggestions of SPI) (Q2. Should I hit the cab with a "wipedown" or sanding of a specific grit? I have heard DA with 80 grit.)

After my black epoxy primer is on, I have read I should block sand it down lightly with 150/180 grit. At this point the body hammer and dollies come out. (Q3. Has anyone heard of a "shrinking hammer"? Is it necessary/needed/important? I have heard good things about the kit from Eastwood)

Now I can work the filler. (Q4. How do you determine the difference between using a lightweight and high build? Any suggestions on brand/type?) Filler requires multiple layers with multiple sanding. (Q5. Is block sanding the correct form of sanding here?)

At this point, if I understand it correctly, I would spray a final coat of epoxy to seal in the under layers. (Q6. Is this the same epoxy primer? Self etching? Poly? Silly questions but it would probably be best if I understood the difference)

I have read on another forum post on guide coats that it is recommended to spray 2 coats of poly primer next. (Q7. Why?)

At this point I would be ready for base/paint. (Q8. Is there one "gun" that can prime and paint or are they separate guns. Are eastwood guns good or are there better suggestions?)

THERE ARE A LOT OF QUESTIONS. THERE ARE A LOT OF CONCERNS. I DONT WANT TO WASTE TIME NOR MONEY ON THIS DUE TO IGNORANCE OR PURE STUPIDITY. I WOULD LOVE HONEST ANSWERS AND ADVICE. THANKS
Attachments
P1040997.JPG
Side view of the cab
P1040999.JPG
The cab sandblasted

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:11 am
40fordpu wrote: . . .Q1. I believe epoxy primer is the best? Why?


Epoxy will protect your metal even if it has to sit a long time before finishing. It also has rust inhibitors and SPI has UV protection as well.

40fordpu wrote:(Q2. Should I hit the cab with a "wipedown" or sanding of a specific grit? I have heard DA with 80 grit.)


The blast media will provide a satisfactory surface for epoxy primer. Normally just blow off the dust and shoot epoxy.

40fordpu wrote:(Q3. Has anyone heard of a "shrinking hammer"? Is it necessary/needed/important? I have heard good things about the kit from Eastwood)


There are better ways to shrink metal without traumatizing it.

40fordpu wrote:(Q4. How do you determine the difference between using a lightweight and high build? Any suggestions on brand/type?)


Rage Gold is popular but expensive. Personally I use Marson Platinum. If you do your hammer and dolly work correctly you shouldn't need a lot of filler.

40fordpu wrote:(Q5. Is block sanding the correct form of sanding here?)


Yes. You block sand everything to get panels straight. 80 grit to get it shaped.

40fordpu wrote: (Q6. Is this the same epoxy primer?


Yes

40fordpu wrote: Self etching? Poly?


Self etching primer uses an acid to etch into the metal. It cannot be used over filler.
Polyester Primers are chemically hardened (like filler) and can be applied over epoxy primer. You need a large tip 1.8 is minimum and have limited time to spray before it sets up in your gun. Supposed to shrink less and provide build to even out panels.


40fordpu wrote:(Q7. Why?)


See above answer.

40fordpu wrote: At this point I would be ready for base/paint.


Not really. You should spray some 2k primer, use guide coat, block sand and repeat until car is perfect.

40fordpu wrote:(Q8. Is there one "gun" that can prime and paint or are they separate guns.


Generally primers require larger tip sizes so a separate primer gun is a good idea. Base, Clear and Single Stage can be shot with the same gun if you clean it properly. A 1.4 tip is a decent size.

40fordpu wrote: Are eastwood guns good or are there better suggestions?)


For starting out I would look at DeVilbiss guns. Many come with multiple tip sizes and they have a good reputation. Remember you have to check CFM requirements on spray guns not just PSI. Be sure your compressor can meet those requirements.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 11:06 pm
Awesome thanks. Here is what I got accomplished today. I need to get on the horse and start buying some of the tools and materials. Where would you recommend buying some of this stuff? Anywhere online you would recommend.

I have seen some paint guns from eastwood but dont know how to pick a gun or gun set.
Pricing is obviously important for me the beginner but I do want something that will get the job done.

Thanks
P1050039.JPG
Door before

P1050043.JPG
Cancer at bottom of door

P1050045.JPG
After sandblasting

P1050051.JPG
After sandblasting 2

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 12:29 am
What do you have for an air compressor. This is the heart of your shop so make sure its big enough to handle the tools you'll be using.
I look for a decent DA sander with some 80 grit PSA discs for stripping paint and preparing metal.
You will need a welder (MIG with gas or TIG preferably) to properly patch the bottom of that door.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 1:32 pm
I have a good compressor, good mig welder and a da sander. Need the sanding discs but I can get those from work. I need the guns, primer, filler, sheet metal, sanding blocks and such.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:30 pm
Sata RP and DeVilbiss Plus are both known to be great clear guns.
Iwata LPH400 Silver Cap 1.4 is what I use for base and clear right now.
Chris has the new Tekna Copper guns available on this site.

I buy all SPI primers, reducers and clears. Just ordered some more last week.
Marson Platinum or Rage Gold for filler.
Sheet metal for fabricating your patches can be purchased from a local steel supply. Mine will cut sheets to specific sizes and even bend pieces to my specifications.
Sanding blocks come in a variety of sizes and styles. Some flexible and some not. For getting panels straight you need rigid blocks, for curves a Durablock Round Block and Teardrop Block work great. An Inline Sander is also helpful on larger panels and those 5" hard rubber blocks are a must have.
I use a Motorguard soft block for hand sanding with finer grits in those difficult to reach places.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2012 7:03 pm
Is there a way to compare SCFM to CFM? I have an air compressor that get 8.6 scfm at 40 psi but the guns talk about cfm. The compressor states it has a displacement of 11.9 cfm. I am looking at the Devilbiss Starting line HLVP paint gun kit for primer and top coat. Is that a good gun? Does it work with my compressor? What do I need to look for. Any ideas? Thanks

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:35 pm
This subject gets a lot of action here. Most home shops have compressors way too small for automotive refinishing tools. It is one of the biggest let downs when you start thinking about restoring or repainting a car that people have to face.
My compressor puts out 15.2 SCFM at 175 psi yet when you look at the compressor rating it is 18.9 CFM.
Image


Here is an explanation that DeWalt tools has on their website:
The rate at which a compressor can deliver air volume is measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM). Because atmospheric pressure plays a role in how fast air moves into the cylinder, the CFM will vary depending upon the atmospheric pressure. It will also vary with the temperature and humidity.

To set an even playing field, manufacturers calculate standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM) as CFM at sea level at 68 degrees farenheit at 36% relative humidity. If you reduce the pressure the SCFM goes up and if you raise the pressure the SCFM goes down.

The CFM and PSI ratings are important because they indicate the tools that a particular compressor can operate.


I know its clear as mud. Notice on my compressor that the SCFM goes up at 100 psi but only by .4 SCFM. So a 75 psi drop in pressure does not gain very much by way of flow rate.

My compressor will hold its own in a one man shop but even it has a hard time with the sandblast cabinet and runs almost continuously with my Porter Cable DA. I would say, and this is my opinion here, that my compressor is the minimum size if you plan to do much of this work. Can you get by with less compressor? Yes, but there will be trade offs.

So for purposes of seeing if your compressor will handle a tool you should go by the SCFM rating. If the spray gun says 13 CFM @ 30 psi you will want a compressor rating of at least 13 SCFM @ 30 psi.

There are LVLP guns that will operate around 9 CFM @ 30 psi and some other guns that claim to use even less. However if you look at high end spray guns they will all consume much more air than their cheaper counterparts.

You may want to look into hooking two compressors together. There are lots of them for sale on Craigslist and if you combine two 8 CFM compressors correctly you will have 16 CFM of output. If I remember correctly that is. :neutral:
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2012 11:02 pm
so a gun that requires 12 cfm at 43 psi can be used with a compressor like mine thats output is 8.6 @40 psi....however, air pressure will be quickly lost and usage would be intermittent correct?
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