Restoration of 1997 Tacoma - Dodge Viper Blue Pearl

Show off your work! Anything from final results to full start-to-finish project journals.

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PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2012 11:54 am
So, you put 3 layers of primer to get a consistent color across?

In my project, I painted straight over a very light single layer of primer. Going your route would have looked much better. Well, 60$ worth of paint has already been applied, but could I just spray primer over that and redo the paint job, or would that cause too many layers?

Also, how much did it cost you in primer? (how many cans and what brand)

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PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 7:36 am
happyd wrote:So, you put 3 layers of primer to get a consistent color across?

In my project, I painted straight over a very light single layer of primer. Going your route would have looked much better. Well, 60$ worth of paint has already been applied, but could I just spray primer over that and redo the paint job, or would that cause too many layers?

Also, how much did it cost you in primer? (how many cans and what brand)


What I applied was 3 coats of high-build primer. What that does is "builds up" a slight thickness of material, and fills in scratches. That way when I sand it down smooth, all the tiny imperfections will be covered. I will still be spraying one wet coat of primer/sealer which is what will seal the surface, blocking any color variations from the substrate from shining through, and allowing a uniform appearance for the new paint.
If you cant go under it, around it, or over it, You need BIGGER TIRES!

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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 2:05 pm
Well the base coat went on beautifully. I love how it looks. I sprayed the clear onto the truck on Monday morning. I am not happy at all. I am not sure what the deal was, but I couldn't get a consistent bit of coverage. I had my gun settings right, the fan was perfect, and the air pressure was spot-on, but I was going too fast I think across the surface, and ended up with a lot of orange peel. I am now deciding on either doing a cut and buff, or waiting until I can get her in the booth again and sand her down with 2000 grit, then take m time to apply a nice, uniform, and heavier coat of clear. What do you guys think?

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:allgood:
If you cant go under it, around it, or over it, You need BIGGER TIRES!

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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 2:25 pm
That's a lot of peel !!!
You're going to have to go a lot coarser than 2000's to get that down but if it were mine I'd hit it with 400's and clear it again.It will probably be quicker and less work.
If I were you I'd practise my technique on a scrap panel first



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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 12:40 am
Holy crap, the worst part about that is that you have orange peel and dry spray which equals sore shoulders...

I didn't really contribute, but like said, I would definitely go straight to somewhere between 400 and 600 grit.

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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 7:15 am
I know it will be a lot of work to fix. I expected it to be. I'm not a pro here, so my technique is still in the process of developing.
If you cant go under it, around it, or over it, You need BIGGER TIRES!



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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 4:24 pm
Can you tell us a little bit about your setup (what gun, psi setting with the trigger pulled, temp in booth, etc...)? It is best to take the advice you have been given, sand the clear with 400 or 600 grit until it flat, and shoot clear again. Before you attempt to shoot again please let us know about your setup so that we can help (not trying to be offensive but that is by far the worst orange peel I have ever seen), there is something seriously wrong with your setup/technique... we are here to help!

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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 9:23 pm
That's really on the wow scale. Very odd that you say the base went on great but then the clear came out like the moon, no offensive :allgood:

There's some really smart guys here, I'm not one of them, but if you provide all the info you can you'll get it figured out. Did you use the same gun? same pressure? when I shoot clear I'm usally 8+psi more. what temp were you in for that matter, and what temp reducer, it's like it never flowed out. :flatten:
Rob

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 11:16 am
coletrain777 wrote:Can you tell us a little bit about your setup (what gun, psi setting with the trigger pulled, temp in booth, etc...)? It is best to take the advice you have been given, sand the clear with 400 or 600 grit until it flat, and shoot clear again. Before you attempt to shoot again please let us know about your setup so that we can help (not trying to be offensive but that is by far the worst orange peel I have ever seen), there is something seriously wrong with your setup/technique... we are here to help!


Well for the clear coat I used http://www.harborfreight.com/high-volume-low-pressure-gravity-feed-spray-gun-66222.html and a 33oz metal cup. At the gun I had the gauge set to 35 psi, trigger pulled. I have a great compressor. It is an industrial 50 gallon dual stage Ingersol Rand. I was using http://www.tcpglobal.com/kustomshop/psheets/070606KC210P.pdf as my clear. I think I was most likely moving my gun too fast, as well as allowing too much over spray when moving from panel to panel (hense the "dry" spots at the panel edges in certain areas.) After allowing it to dry, it is not quite so bad. I mean don't get me wrong, the orange peel is BAD, but not as bad as it was when I first shot it and took the pictures. As for the environment, the temp was around 85-90 inside the booth, humidity was below 25%.

So that was the environment when I clear coated. I expect I will smooth it down mostly with 400, then come back with 2000 to get rid of the 400 grit scratches. After that it will be another trip in the booth to spray another coat. I plan on getting a spare panel to run some test coats to see if I can get my speed more consistent, and no overspray. As for my order of spraying, if that is wanted, I started on the roof, then the hood. I moved to the side of the cab where I ran from top to bottom, and from front of fender to around corner of back of the cab, spraying the full length. After that I took care of the back of the cab, the front of the bed, then each side of the bed, and the tailgate (which was on a separate stand, off the truck).
If you cant go under it, around it, or over it, You need BIGGER TIRES!



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 2:05 pm
Take Daz's advice and practice on scrap panels first. Using practice panels was the best initial advice I got on these forums.
You could use anything metal, like discarded folding tables, discarded steel entry doors, or banged up panels from auto body shops.
Spray a small area, check the results, and keep adjusting the gun on subsequent areas until it comes out the way you want it. Beats having to do all that sanding, and drastically reduces the risk of sanding through the clear and having to paint a whole panel, or even a whole side all over again.
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