SPI clear soft?

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 2011 12:36 pm
ricke, your correct with your activator. when you do your stripe in the 70 deg. range use the normal and use mid temp reducer or what you used before. 70 + is to hot for cold tenp (fast) activator. :)
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 2011 1:30 pm
So anything below 70 deg. should use fast activator? I also have put a torpedo heater in the room today and I can get the temp up to about 110 deg. If this does not totally harden everthing up, will I be ok to reshoot clear on top of it and have the new clear retain its normal hardness?



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PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 2011 4:54 pm
let it sit outside!!!!!! Just heat alone will not help enough!.......uv rays will pull the solvents out from the very bottom! heat alone, will not.

Untill you let the clear cure a good day outside, recoating it with more clear will run the risk of even more problems. doesn't matter how long it sits inside, in the heat.

My process, with 4 coats of clear, after clearing is cutting down flat and left outside in the sun a full day. doesn't matter if it is 50 degrees or 90 degrees. Back in the next day, finish sanding my way up to 3000 from 800 and buff. Zero problems.

By nature, the universal clear is a softer clear and it will generally stay softer than others. That is a good thing, because it stays flexible. You can fix a surface scratch/flaw a whole lot better than fixing a chip down to the primer from the clear being hard and brittle.



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 4:38 pm
coronet I sent you a pm

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 7:00 pm
ricke79630 wrote:coronet I sent you a pm


Got it.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 12:57 pm
'68 Coronet R/T wrote:You said earlier you reduced it. The reason I asked for details is because something is obviously wrong and it is impossible to help you find out without know every step you took and the products you used.
For instance: a shop temperature of 65-70 should be adequate but if you quickly heated a freezing garage to 65 then the metal could still be 40-45 degrees.
I use SPI all the time and have never had a single problem with it. In fact I usually have to "slow it down" so it has time to flow out before hardening.


I too have no problems with this clear

But If your shop is cooling down to under 60 degrees this could be your problem.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 1:36 pm
Urethanes will almost stop curing at below 50F. They still cure, but it takes a lot longer. Anything above 60-65F and everything is a lot better, 70-75F and you're doing perfect.
When Urethanes and epoxies are curing/crosslinking, a chemical reaction is taking place. If the material, surface temp, or ambient temp is too low - chemical reaction/curing slows way down or stops.

It doesn't matter how much UV rays you put on a panel, unless you get it up above 50-55F for it to cure out completely. The reason it works well by putting it in the sun all day, is because you're essentially baking the car all day at low temp with fresh air circulating constantly. Panel painting with a UV lamp works well because you are heating the metal with the lamp, spraying your panel and curing it out all under heat. If you only use your IR lamps during cure, you're not getting the full use of the lamp. The main problems with curing is not having your metal/part up to temp, ambient temp and curing temp all out of whack. The worst thing I've ever done was shot a cold panel and let it sit in a cold shop...tons of drips and runs the next day. Looked fine at the time though! :goodjob:



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:47 pm
This is not the problem, the next day I shot another part, kept the shop temp. up to 70, shop temp did not drop below 65 during the night and still had the same problem.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 7:02 pm
I've read nothing but positivies on this clear yet I haven't really had very much luck with it. I've got panels that were buffed a while ago and looked good but now the clear appears to still be shrinking. I've got other parts that still scratch too easy. I used a cheap basecoat (4th dimension) and I read that sometimes these cheaper basecoats pull the solvents from the clear and cause problems. Don't know if that's what my problem is or not. I'm going to use the Euro clear next time and see if I like it any better. What basecoat did you use?

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:05 am
Did you contact SPI and see what they have to say? It sounds like you followed the instructions. Its possible the material was spoiled in shipping if it was frozen at some point. I would contact them asap just in case there's a problem with the batch.
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