Painting over previous paint job

General Discussion. Make yourself at home...read, ask and answer!



Settled In
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2004 6:06 pm
PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 10:38 pm
Is it necessary to paint a coat of primer over the old paint before applying the new paint? Or..can you just paint right over the previous paint?
Why would you do one over the other?

User avatar

No Turning Back
Posts: 628
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2005 11:10 pm
PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 11:09 pm
if the old paint's solid, you can just scuff it and shoot on top of it

User avatar

No Turning Back
Posts: 701
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 3:30 pm
PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 11:23 am
Also depends on if it's a color change or the same color. Like if it's blue and your respraying it blue then it's not necessary. But if your changing colors(especially from dark to light) you should seal it.

User avatar

Settled In
Posts: 45
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 11:15 am
Location: Modesto, CA
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 10:58 am
Isn't there also a chance that a certain type of old paint won't let the new paint adhere properly to it? Chemistry wise? I could have sworn some new paints [paint components] don't play nice nice with old paints [paint components].

Rob

User avatar

No Turning Back
Posts: 701
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 3:30 pm
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 11:05 am
That true, lacquers mainly aren't compatible friendly. Depends on how old the paint is



Fully Engaged
Posts: 369
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 4:00 pm
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 11:06 am
If it is a FACTORY paint job I'd just scuff it and shoot it. If it was done by anybody else I'd sand it real good then seal it first before shooting a new paint job on top of it.
"EZ"
Ringgold, GA.
Custom Painter Wannabe



Settled In
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2004 6:06 pm
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 8:50 pm
Thank you guys for all your great comments and good advice!!
John

User avatar

Fully Engaged
Posts: 247
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2006 12:53 am
Location: Southern California, Los Angeles
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:37 am
Ezrider800 wrote:If it is a FACTORY paint job I'd just scuff it and shoot it. If it was done by anybody else I'd sand it real good then seal it first before shooting a new paint job on top of it.


ezrider. what do you mean by sand it real good??

I have some fiberglass pieces that i painted on my frist job which i did a really bad job gtettig the primer sanded perfectly smooth and flat. THAT and combined with some curing issues of the fg/under the frest paint made for my paint job going kinda crappy..... Im thinking of sanding it back down real good but i dont know what i should do sorta. I was planning either to just sand the really crappy clear down with 400 and reshoot,, or resand through the existing clear and base and reprimer/seal and flatten.

Thanx

-B-
The Noobs will Rule!



Fully Engaged
Posts: 269
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 4:16 pm
Location: FL Beaches
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 5:30 am
Ezrider800 wrote:If it is a FACTORY paint job I'd just scuff it and shoot it. If it was done by anybody else I'd sand it real good then seal it first before shooting a new paint job on top of it.



Not if its factory lacquer, then you have other considerations.

Most GM cars to 1990 fall under this consideration.

With your lack of experience you should not just blurt out blanket statements to mess other people up.
Bobby



Fully Engaged
Posts: 369
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 4:00 pm
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 10:04 am
B-Unit wrote:
Ezrider800 wrote:If it is a FACTORY paint job I'd just scuff it and shoot it. If it was done by anybody else I'd sand it real good then seal it first before shooting a new paint job on top of it.


ezrider. what do you mean by sand it real good??


If it was a factory paint job you could just sand with 400 grit and shoot your paint. The Factory paint job is a very solid base that you don't need to primer over or seal most of the time. This is assuming no body work is necessary.

The reason I said I would "sand it real good" if it wasn't a factory paint job it because you never know if the old paint job was done properly or more importantly the prep work was done properly. If it wasn't a Factory paint job I'd start with 80 grit and a DA and sand most of the old paint back off and start over. You might find 3 or 4 paint jobs underneath when you do this!!!! :shock: It would be a big waste of time and effort to put a good paint job over crappy old work and then have problems down the road.

So my rule of thumb would be if you don't know what's under your paint job then SAND IT DOWN!! :D
"EZ"
Ringgold, GA.
Custom Painter Wannabe
Next

Return to Body and Paint

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 50 guests