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Purpose of low pressure drop coat?

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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 1:33 am
How does a low pressure drop coat help even out the metallic on the last coat of base? One would think the paint would not atomize with low air pressure???? Any of you guys have a idea?
PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 4:43 am
Sherwin Williams used to recommend doing that on there last coat,,,I never did it, and the paint matched 95% of the time.
I wouldn't recommend that to a rookie. If you don't know what you are doing,,you can really screw up a paint job.

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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 9:15 am
Basf recommends their drop coats for blending, its more beneficial on silvers and golds that are prone to haloing. It enables your basecoat to land wet on the surface evenly (so does a dry or mist coat) so you have the same effect. It eliminates having a dry edge so you don't end up with a halo. I use this technique only for spot repairs and difficult colors. Most of the time I just step out my color.
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 1:12 pm
:shock: You're getting dry spots in blends because you're blending it the wrong way. I mean I blend in to the repair by starting where i wan't to lose it. Than by the gradual pull of the trigger will allow proper atomization into you reair. If it ever gets dry by doing it this way is if you use the wrong reducer. It's all trigger control 8) Just my :idea:
Just walk away....

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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 1:44 pm
Robert LaPierre wrote::shock: You're getting dry spots in blends because you're blending it the wrong way.


thanks for clearing that up.. :roll:

Robert LaPierre wrote: I mean I blend in to the repair by starting where i wan't to lose it. Than by the gradual pull of the trigger will allow proper atomization into you reair. If it ever gets dry by doing it this way is if you use the wrong reducer. It's all trigger control 8) Just my :idea:


i can hardly make sense of what your trying to say, I think your missing a few points here:

A. The original poster is asking about a drop coat, this has nothing to do with that.

B. when blending basecoat, especially on difficult colors it is necessary to fan out your basecoat, therefore the paint at the begging of your fan lands wetter than the paint at the end of your fan. This has nothing to do with reducer speed.
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 4:03 pm
Reducer speed is more important with a blend than it is on an all over.
And when you spray a blend you start at your primer area and taper it out away from it.

I have never in my life seen anyone spray a blend "Backwards" like you just said.............Do they teach you that in BASF school?

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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 4:30 pm
Old Dupont Guy wrote:Reducer speed is more important with a blend than it is on an all over.
And when you spray a blend you start at your primer area and taper it out away from it.

I have never in my life seen anyone spray a blend "Backwards" like you just said.............Do they teach you that in BASF school?


they do teach that as one of many methods, they call it the "reverse blend". I don't like it personally. I prefer just steping it out starting from the primer, sometimes I'll add a bit of bc100 (clear binder) to help blend out certain colors. They don't really say its to much advantage, just easier for some people I guess. They don't specify any of the blend techniques really as being better than any other, just personal preference.
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 12:59 am
Old Dupont Guy wrote:Reducer speed is more important with a blend than it is on an all over.
And when you spray a blend you start at your primer area and taper it out away from it.

I have never in my life seen anyone spray a blend "Backwards" like you just said.............Do they teach you that in BASF school?


We were taught to blend a single stage 'into' the repair area....I guess you could call that 'backwards'.
PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 6:30 am
WOW! I cant believe that they teach that :shock:

That seems like it would be almost impossible to do it that way. I wouldn't even think of doing it like that.
Its so easy the other way,,,a cave man could do it.

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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 10:02 am
I think the theory behind the reverse blend is the metallics are supposed to lay down easier because your basecoat is over a perfectly smooth surface with no dry overspray from fanning out prior coats. I've tryed it out on a few jobs, I found it difficult to judge exactly where to put each coat, depending on the transparency of the paint , where you put each coat will obviously vary.

I actually found it to be to a disadvantage because if you have a very tricky color, you can't really add any clear into your base to help you blend it out since your blend is on your first coat. (you could if you wanted to get technical but I find this way makes doing so a pain). So if you go as far as possible with your blend on your first coat and then find out its a challenging color, now its too late or at least more difficult to correct it.
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