• Advertisement
 

hammer and dolly help

More of an art than a science - discuss metalworking and welding here.



Non-Lurker
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:46 am

Country:
USA
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 3:54 pm
Hi guys sense I'm new to anytype of body work I went out and bought a beginner hammer and dolly set from hf just to learn. I got a couple junk cars in the back I took a trunk panel off and began beating away getting no where!! Maybe somone can shine some light my way I would love to hear tips and tricks! Thank you
Attachments
IMAG0195.jpg
IMAG0194.jpg



Fully Engaged
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2011 2:30 am
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 9:55 pm
rayfrausto wrote:Hi guys sense I'm new to anytype of body work I went out and bought a beginner hammer and dolly set from hf just to learn. I got a couple junk cars in the back I took a trunk panel off and began beating away getting no where!! Maybe somone can shine some light my way I would love to hear tips and tricks! Thank you



Ray, the information you are asking about could fill a thick book. You need to be more specific about exactly what type of damage you are trying to repair. Preferably with a picture or two of the damage. A hammer and dolly work fine in some situations but much more than not a stud welder is used to pull dents. Pick out a specific kind of dent or crease and we can walk you through the repair. Naturally anytime you use a hammer and dolly combination there has to be access to the back side of the dent or crease. So a door with a sideguard beam severely restricts the use of a hammer/dolly combination. Front half of quarter panels are almost impossible to work on with a dolly unless you removed the seats and the interior trim and even then its hard to access workable spots.



Settled In
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2011 3:16 am

Country:
Canada
PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 5:21 pm
I was reading an old bumping manual(key to metal bumping) and got a good analogy, take a hairpin and imagine that it is a cross section of the damaged area,open it up and see if it ill go back to its straight shape,it won't,you could even take a peice of wire and bend in the middle and try to return it to its flat shape by bending at the edges, it won't because it has been bent beyond its elastic limit, the same with dents, but if you were to take a peice of wire bend it then try to straighten it by getting close to the bent area it will more successfully return to its original shape right, so when fixing dents you have to repair damage as close to original dent and exactly back out through the sequence of damage in reverse, worse damage first.Damage also forms rolls or hi spots adjacent to damage areas, you want to push against the high spots or hammer them down and subsequently push up against the dent with a dolly, if you cannot force it then use a corner of the dolly on smaller area then smoothen,it out later with flat surface of dolly and hammer but be careful of on dolly hammering because their are people that can take a peice of silver and make a plate from a drop of silver,what I am saying is you also don't want to increase the area of the dent by hammering away at the surface with a dolly behind it unknowingly stretching it.All dents are also stretched metal the area has been increased as it was pushed out.It is hard to explain because you have to learn how to analyze your damage.Got it?
best
Look here for additional help;http://www.oldcarsweekly.com/resto_series_number_2_sheet_metal_basics

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 4960
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 6:16 pm
Did you read this: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=18781
A wealth of information right here.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31

User avatar

Top Contributor
Posts: 3107
Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2010 10:52 pm

Country:
USA
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 12:41 pm
The little red book called Key To Metal Bumping is great info. Buy it and read. Read it years ago.
Never argue with an idiot, he will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

Return to Welding & Metal Fab

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests