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TINTED PRIMER?

General Discussion. Make yourself at home...read, ask and answer!



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:10 pm
I read on this forum where someone uses a tinted sealer beneath their basecoat. They use red tinted under red and white beneath yellow. This sound like a good idea since a rock chip or poor basecoat coverage wouldnt be as noticeable. Ive never seen this done since being a hobbyist Ive only used gray or black primer or sealer. I was just wondering how I would get other colors I mean is there something that you can add to black or gray sealer to tint it ? Also what is the visual effect If I paint yellow over black or yellow over gray? If I get good coverage on either colored sealer will any color base still look the same or will they look darker or lighter? THANKS

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:19 pm
SIKKENS do a tinted primer reds yellow blue.if your spraying yellow its best use a white primer.Grey or dark primers tend to make yellow a Greene looking yellow'2k primers i tint with solid colors.You are not supposed to but it works .So if your doing a red color,. tint your primer with a red solid color.IT may turn out pink so you might have to add another color. Like i said your not supposed to do it . i have had no problem in doing this .Don't add a lot of color as you still need this to be a primer.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:21 pm
Colored primers are a bit over-rated IMO. They are pretty to apply and if you get a close color it will help take the bite out stonechips should they occur, but that's about the extent of there usefullness.

You will need a specific primer that allows you to tint it but it can be hard still to get a close color to your topcoat, a bit of a guessing game trying to stay at the correct mixing ratio.

When it comes to helping with coverage they don't do anything unless your adjusting the value to an ideal level. The hue (color) of the primer will not influence coverage. If you bring your value closer to the ideal range for your topcoat you can cut down on the amount of paint required to cover it. Regardless of the undercoat color, once its completely covered you should have the same color topcoat.
http://www.autobodyreviews.com

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 3:39 pm
jIMMO you need to keep things a bit not to technical for new comers.Especially beginners.Just a comment dont take it to hart.

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Location: new jersey
PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 6:03 pm
most paint companies that i am aware of have kinda gotten off the tinted sealers and just use a value shade type sealer which is just different shades of grey going from white all the way to black. the brightness or value is really what matters. tinted sealers just get expensive since your mixing in expensive basecoats or toners into the sealer. i keep my primer and sealer here in white and black then intermix to get any shade of grey i need.



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 9:02 pm
I really like the colored sealers. Besides saving on coats and basecoat material it is a good selling feature when you are selling a job to a potential customer. People like the idea of less visible stone chips. As far as the cost goes these guys make a nice colored sealer and it is very affordable.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Red-Yell ... veQ5fTools

I prefer it over tinting primer. These are nice clean colors. They even have a metallic sealer. I like color build from sikken also but it's like three times the cost and it realliy doesn't perform any better to me.



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 12:02 pm
What jimmo and jimc said.
A hobbiest needs to stick with less material stock,for sure.
A tinted primer is just that.A special raw primer that HAS to be tinted with a mix color to work.Then stirred well together,activated and then reduced to a sprayable mixture.
I used Glasurit 285-75 Tintable as a primer for the bodymen in the metal shop and as a sealer for myself in the paint shop for twenty two years.Just at a different mix ratio when used as a sealer.I was'nt paying the material costs so I did'nt worry about the 21 line tint that went into the primer or sealer.
As a sealer it offered a nearly zero die back.
As a primer it filled excellent and one could mix it to nearly the color of the car.And it water sanded like a dream.
Now that I have my own small operation,I still use Glasurit,but not the tintable primer. Why?
Because now its my money and materials cost.
Now its 285-60 primer,285-100 white primer for whites and pearls,and little if any sealer,which I mix off of the 285-60 primer.
Strandberg Auto Rebuilding,Inc.

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Location: new jersey
PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 3:56 pm
absolutely. when i got set up with rm they gave me a gallon of their dp31 sealer which i believe was a 4:1 mix with basecoat. well if you are painting the car solid red what on earth are you saving when you have to put 25% red basecoat in it that cost $700 a gallon. a white or light grey sealer will give the same color in the same amount of coats because the brightness or value or the sealer is the same as the red base. its really about cost. as others above mentioned the only advantage to a colored sealer is if you get a chip and it happens to chip off at the sealer.



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 9:02 pm
I agree with you guys about the "tintable" primers that require adding tint or basecoat to achieve a color. It is not practical for small operations or the do it yourselfer. However, I think it is important to distinguish between a tintable primer and a colored primer. A tintable primer requires a tint or as Jim said an expensive basecoat color to be added to it inorder to achieve your color. A colored primer is one that already has the tint added. Colored primer is a great choice for all size shops and do it yourselfers. There are no tints to stock and you don't need to add any expensive base. You can order the appropriate color primer at the same time you order your base. Makes life easier to me. No mixing of black and white primers to make the right shade of gray. Just add your activator and reducer and start painting.

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Location: new jersey
PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 7:02 am
yes if you can buy primer in the color you need then go for it. the company posted earlier in the thread is the only one i have ever seen with a big array of colors like that.
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