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Guide Coat

General Discussion. Make yourself at home...read, ask and answer!

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 11:57 pm
mtp wrote:so i take it that if you repair an area with body filler and sand it smooth you do not want to reach any bare metal?


When doing filler work it is expected that you will sand to metal in places. You are trying to fill just the low area and feather the filler out into the surrounding panel.

mtp wrote: Or is that you dont want to reach the bare metal after applying the primer?


Once your repairs have been completed and sealed with epoxy (my choice) you spray 3 - 4 coats of 2k primer and then block sand the panel straight which should happen before you reach your epoxy layer. This is why the guide coat is so helpful. Once the guide coat has been sanded off you move on down the panel.

mtp wrote: . . . im using a foam block sander and have the feeling that its too soft not really getting the area flat rather forming around the high spot if that makes sense.


The first round of block sanding should be done with coarser grit so it cuts easier and flatter plus a long sanding block that is firm and straight. Most of the first round of 2k will be sanded off the car by the time you get it straight. Also remember not to push too hard on the block and change your paper often.

mtp wrote:im working on a rounded area of the rear quarter panel of my miata. thanks all.


For tighter curves and rounded areas use a round shaped or narrow rectangular durablock style sanding block.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 10:01 am
Awesome thanks. Looks like I have lots of work still ahead.this sure is taking longer than originally planned, but to do it right it's probably worth it in the end.
Names Matt. Is it better to have too much stuff and not enough space, or too much space and not enough stuff?

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 11:54 am
Restoration work always takes longer and costs more than what people think.
Putting 200+ hours of labor into a project is not unusual at all.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 2:11 pm
You guys that really know what you are doing make it look so easy. I wish I could spend a month sitting close and watching you work.

Then I'd probably still screw it up.... :cry:

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 9:54 am
^i agree completely. write down each step taken and when and how. like should i be pressing hard to sand the body filler, when should i change and to what grit yeyeyeye its a lot to know. i just really wish i had a close buddy that knew his stuff and i can learn from.
Names Matt. Is it better to have too much stuff and not enough space, or too much space and not enough stuff?

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 5:26 pm
Its really not all that difficult if you just take it one step at a time.
Get your overall plan together and write down the steps necessary to complete it.
For example:
1. dismantle car. Materials needed: digital camera for hundreds of pictures used in reassembly, baggies and tags for small parts, note pad for detailed information (i.e. needs repair, purchase replacement, send from chrome plating, etc.), storage area, and so on. Tools needed: (here you list tools you don't have and specialty tools to rent or buy)
2. Strip paint. Materials needed: sanding discs, aircraft stripper, safety glasses, gloves, single edge razor blades, etc. Tools needed: 6" DA, PSA backing pad, etc.

If you follow this process and read up on what tools and techniques to use at each step your project will come along fine and maybe get completed. Most guys that do not have a plan written down end up selling their unfinished project because they get overwhelmed along the way.

Oh and another thing, FORGET about the TV shows where they complete a car in a week unless you have unlimited funds. Those shows pay big $$$ for all the subcontracted work being done by engine builders, interior guys, paint shops, suspension shops, etc.

Also: Don't get way ahead of yourself and order paint and clear when you are still at the stripping the paint stage. Having $800 - $1600 of material sitting on the shelf for a year or more doesn't make a lot of sense. You'll need the money for other things along the way.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 11:30 pm
'68 Coronet R/T -> Excellent, sage advice - thanks! Funny, but I have done everything just as you described in step 1 in my current restoration project, which is my first full-blown effort (others have been "partials" or "refurbs"). As a result I have friends and co-workers who have laughed at my analness with all of the baggies, notepads and tons of pictures. I've also videoed some of it along the way, with the hope being that it might help even further during re-assembly.

I am curious about your opinion (and everyone else's too) regarding the subject of dipping versus other methods of stripping a car down to bare metal. With my current project I really don't have much of a choice, but the dipping route was by far the most expensive of any option I researched (grinding, blasting, dipping were the basic three). Anyone else had experience with this that they can relate?
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 2:38 pm
I took hundreds, maybe a thousand pics of the car coming apart and used many zip lock bags with labels for hardware and small parts and now that I am putting it together it is pretty easy. I have found a few things I should have done better but so far so good. My buddy is doing a Jimmie and he started with bags and no pics and stopped using the bags. Now he is spending a lot of time searching for the right hardware and wishing he had a pic to remind him of orientation. He has also removed a few bolts when he realized they went somewhere else based on length. This is my first full project but I know I would have had a harder time without those aids.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:51 pm
because im cheap,and dutch.i try not spending money lol.i made my own from 1/8 mahogany plywood.
use a hot glue gun and takes 2 seconds to change paper.this plywood soaked in water bends to a perfect arch and wont crack.
i made different lenght ones, even glued handles on them,in my opinion you cant buy anything better than what i made.
after i final sanded with these blocks i did my guide coat and not one single spot.
also found some heavy flex foam,same thing glue on the paper.
dont glue the paper to face fold it over then glue it
wood must soak in water for one hour before starting.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:17 pm
Topic is now locked, thanks Jim for a great sticky.

Anyone who has new questions should start a new topic in the forum.
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