• Advertisement
 

Issues with my 'final' coat of primer. Scratches, runs, pics

General Discussion. Make yourself at home...read, ask and answer!



No Turning Back
Posts: 593
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:34 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:10 am
So I've sprayed what I hope to be a final 2 coats of 2k primer. I've ran into a couple issues though. The first one I couldn't take a picture of, but in a few areas, there are some deep scratches I guess I missed. I'd say 36-80 grit. A few places, a few inches each place. How would you deal with these? And would you deal with these after sanding the whole car? It almost seems to be I'd have better luck if I just scuffed those areas, put some glaze in the scratches, then spot primed before I sand the whole car.

My worry there is I'll have higher build of primer there (due to scuffing and spot priming) so it might be hard for me to level them? I plan on only using 320 then 600 from now on.

I've also procured some runs.

Small one here

Image


GIANT one here (really thick too, at the bottom of the scoop/top of the run. Maybe 1" wide as well!!)

Image


And i'm not sure what these are? Runs about to happen??

Image


Options for the first two? Razor as much as I can, then sand with 320? Will it level them? (those scoops are like a funnel for making drips!).

The last 'drip', or splotches? Just sand? I'm open to ideas here..

Finally, there was 2 spots that the hose hit the car (grrr!). Made a sort of divot in the high build.. Sand out? Fill with glaze, then sand? I'd have to sand first to scuff I assuem though?

To summarize. Would you guys scuff those areas then repair? Or would you sand the whole car, then repair? I'm afraid that might be the more difficult option though, as it would be harder to blend? Here's a shot of the whole thing.

Image


Thanks guys!



Fully Engaged
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2011 2:30 am
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 10:14 am
Nice car JohnnyK. My preference has always been for the Ford Mustangs. Sounds to me like you're putting more pressure on yourself than is warranted. Runs in primer is not a big deal at all. Just sand them flat and you're good to go. One mistake a lot of lesser experienced people do is use too fine of a sandpaper for block sanding. That applies especially to build type primers and applies to a lesser degree with clear coat sanding for a a "cut-n-buff". I would use 160 or 180 grit sandpaper on a sanding block to get rid of the primer runs on the outer parts of the panels. You have a couple good sized runs (like the inside lip of the side scoop) Sand those by hand with 160 or 180 grit also.

Repair/sand flat all the runs in the primer first. Use a little spot putty in those spots like the deep sand scratches you show a picture of. Spray on a little more primer after sanding the putty flat in those areas and also a little more primer where you repaired the primer runs. Spray on a little guidecoat over the whole car the block sand the whole car.

Have you sanded the whole car with guidecoat already (before you got the runs in the primer) ? I'm trying to figure out exactly were you are in the primer/sanding/blocking sequence (before the runs) which will affect you next plan of action.

I have been directly involved in restoring at least 1964 1/2 to 1973 Mustangs with at least 10 of them my own cars. I have owned a '64 1/4 convertible, 65 Fastback (built - go fast car), '66 Fastback 2+2 from Alabama, '67 coupe and several '71, '73 and '73 Mach I Fastbacks and one 71 Mach I convertible. The '66 Fastback 2+2 and the '71 Mach I convertible were my two personal favorites.

The last couple years I was thinking of buying and restoring another old Mustang for myself to keep and drive but I figured I would have close to $15,000 to $20,000 in a nice close to rust free car by the time I was done doing the restoration. I've been though it several times already and I know its a LOT of work doing a nice restoration. I happened to drive by my local Ford dealership used car lot last early summer and there sat a 2007 Mustang Shelby black with silver stripes. It was like there was a big sign over it saying " Phil, buy me now, you know you want to ". I checked it over really close and it still looked like new. It has 14,200 miles on it. The next day I was driving my new Mustang Shelby. As a matter of fact when I finish up here on the computer I'm taking it for a nice ride for a couple hours. On a car like that gas mileage is not an issue but it surprised me anyway that it averages around 20 miles to the gallon (has a built in trip computer). That is one FUN car to drive.

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 4849
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 10:50 am
Phil V wrote:. . . Use a little spot putty in those spots like the deep sand scratches you show a picture of. Spray on a little more primer after sanding the putty flat in those areas and also a little more primer where you repaired the primer runs. Spray on a little guidecoat over the whole car the block sand the whole car. . .


Just to clarify - make sure you use a quality 2 part glazing putty and not the generic red stuff.

I agree with Phil you are sweating this stage a little too much. The car is looking sweet and your attention to detail will pay off in the end results.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



No Turning Back
Posts: 593
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:34 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:02 am
Thanks for the replies guys!

Phil, I didn't know you were a stang guy! Good to know!

I should have clarified where I am.. I already had 2 thickish coats of 2K primer.. Did a bit more filler work where needed.. Broke through a few places.. A bit more epoxy.. A few little touch ups of 2K here and there.

Then I sprayed these 2 thick coats on the weekend, HOPING that they were my final coats.. I originally planned on not getting any runs (haha) and just sanding with 320 and 600 then shooting colour.

So you guys are saying don't sweat it, it's just primer, BUT, I was hoping it was the last of the primer! :D

Phil, you say 180 or so, but then what would I do? Just spot prime with 2K again on those areas?

I assume I need to scuff before touching up with glaze.. So just scuff those areas.. touch up with glaze.. Spot primer with 2K, THEN sand the whole car?

Is it feasible to blend in spot primed 2k areas with 320? Or would I need to drop down to 180 again? if I have to do that, won't I be moving backwards? Then I'd need more 2k to cover those scratches, etc , etc?

Feel like I'm just running in circles at this point.

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 4849
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:37 pm
Personally, I would guide coat and sand it with 180 just until the guide coat is gone then move to finish sanding. I didn't see anything in the pictures that shouldn't sand out just fine.

Maybe Phil will have a different opinion.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



No Turning Back
Posts: 593
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:34 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 4:49 pm
Sand 180, then jump to 320 and 600 without repriming? Will that work, or leave scratches?

My only fear with that, is busting through these 2 layers of 2K.. Which means I'll hit the other SPI brand of 2K. Which is yellow.. Which would make my car splotchy-coloured, which would necessitate a sealer!

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 4849
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:12 pm
If the guide coat is completely sanded off there will be no scratches left. I like to use the 3M dry guide coat because it is such a fine powder it gets into any scratches or blemishes so they show up until gone.
You probably only need 180 on the runs and once they are down jump to the 320 to reduce the chance of over sanding while removing the guide coat.
If your car has been blocked straight already the amount you will need to sand is pretty minimal to remove the guide coat.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



No Turning Back
Posts: 593
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:34 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:46 pm
Awesome. This is encouraging.

Any idea what those 'blobs' are in the one photo?

Now, I'm still unsure.. Any problem with filling the scratches with glaze and spot priming? Or will that area of primer always be higher (if I'm only using 320. I understand 180 would bring it down, but would 320?)

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 4849
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:25 pm
Blobs are spots where you got a little close or heavy on the spray and puddled the primer a bit.
Start sanding with guide coat and see where it gets you before worrying about glazing putty. If you had it blocked straight already this stuff should sand out.
1968 Coronet R/T - a work in progress.


ACTS 16:31



No Turning Back
Posts: 593
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:34 pm
PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2012 6:31 am
Thanks again. It should block out, but then it will hit the yellow SPI primer.. And at that point, I suppose it would be bad to apply colour if the car is two different colours of primer, correct?

So those blobs don't look like contamination or anything to you guys?
Next

Return to Body and Paint

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], MSNbot Media, superman22x and 60 guests