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scuffing fiberglass hood

Anything goes in the world of fiberglass and plastic

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2012 2:35 pm
Sometimes other than only out of necessity you need passion for it. But I know what you mean!!

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:03 pm
I love working on it, I just seem to keep getting into situations where I have to do the same stuff over and over just in a different order, or just flat cause I did it wrong to start with....I`m only at an 80 block overall on the car, I`m not even close to done yet. I just need the next few steps to go right for a change, so I don`t lose any more confidence than I already have. I`ve got bare metal exposed in a number of spots, making me really want to get it covered up to prevent flash rust.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 6:44 pm
OldDupontGuy wrote:You can use epoxy,,,but regular 2K filler primer will adhere to regular fiberglass panels just fine.

"OR" you can block it, spray 2-3 coats of the 2K, let it dry for a couple days, then block it again with 220, then spray two coats of the epoxy. This would be the best way to handle it....


First off thanks ODG I REALLY appreciate your wisdom and the time you spend helping out! :worthy: NOW on to my question. It has been said that if you have one clock you KNOW what time it is, if you have two . . . you're never sure!
I consider body work painting to be an art or at the least a craft. So there ore never hard and fast rules. First "rule" is to follow the P sheet. BUT there are exceptions to all rules. I'm looking to scuff and shoot some new fiberglass (fenders, trunk lid etc.) with HOK KD2000 epoxy "high fill" primer. I want to get the epoxy on for a couple of reasons; first to seal the fiberglass and second to have something to block sand to make sure it is all smooth and correct.
NOW . . . The P sheet states that for new parts of factory finish use 80 to 180 P grit for a tooth. NO WAY I'm hitting this with 80, but the recommendation here seems to be for 220 P. Will that provide a good enough tooth for the epoxy or should I hit it with the 180? I want to get it right don't need no "stinking pealing"! Any sage advice??? MANY thanks! Mel

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:21 pm
65fastbackresto wrote:I love working on it, I just seem to keep getting into situations where I have to do the same stuff over and over just in a different order, or just flat cause I did it wrong to start with....I`m only at an 80 block overall on the car, I`m not even close to done yet. I just need the next few steps to go right for a change, so I don`t lose any more confidence than I already have. I`ve got bare metal exposed in a number of spots, making me really want to get it covered up to prevent flash rust.


Don't stress.... just brush or spot a coat or two of epoxy on the bare metal and finish the rest in 80. block the epoxy back down before proceeding. I would hit the 80 a few licks with 180 then go for more high build after spotting the bare metal.
Never argue with an idiot, he will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.
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