Buick T-Type (Grand National) Full paint!

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2014 4:14 pm
Any blocking kits anyone can reccommend?

What about DA's?

The guy I bought it from seemed to be trying to maybe do a panel at a time or something. As you can see he put the mud on the bottom of the doors, and primed the car in certain areas? Any recommendations on what products i should look into?

Where should I start with the car?



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:21 pm
Well I picked up a used Campbell hausfeld air compressor its used, 80gallon but they cheaped out on the motor when the motor went bad instead of installing a 7hp like it called for they installed a 3hp... So I might need to change the motor :/ or maybe I will be ok.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 9:31 am
wahoo wrote:Any blocking kits anyone can reccommend?

What about DA's?

The guy I bought it from seemed to be trying to maybe do a panel at a time or something. As you can see he put the mud on the bottom of the doors, and primed the car in certain areas? Any recommendations on what products i should look into?

Where should I start with the car?


In order to do a complete paint job you will need to remove the trim, locks, door handles, etc. and having the proper tools for this will help.
I like to use the longest sanding block feasible for a panel. Also I prefer to use blocks that don't flex on the flat surfaces.
You will want to remove all the filler the other guy put on there. Being exposed to the elements it no doubt has absorbed moisture and contaminants.
When block sanding use a coarse grit to get things straight. The biggest mistake most beginners make is pressing too hard on the sanding block and flexing the panels. This may not be noticeable to you at the time but you will find yourself reapplying filler over and over again on the same area and not getting any satisfactory results.
Change the sand paper as soon as it stops cutting (you will feel like you are wasting it) rather than pushing harder on the block.

I use Marson Platinum filler (not the plus) but Rage and others are good as well. You will find the cheaper ones sand like concrete.
Try to work the dents and patches so that you use as little filler as possible to get things straight. Apply the filler well past the dent area and when you think you have it right apply a skim coat of filler and then guide coat and black sand to make sure.

Once the entire car has been prepped and sanded you can apply a couple of coats of epoxy primer.
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 4:40 pm
'68 Coronet R/T wrote:
wahoo wrote:Any blocking kits anyone can reccommend?

What about DA's?

The guy I bought it from seemed to be trying to maybe do a panel at a time or something. As you can see he put the mud on the bottom of the doors, and primed the car in certain areas? Any recommendations on what products i should look into?

Where should I start with the car?


In order to do a complete paint job you will need to remove the trim, locks, door handles, etc. and having the proper tools for this will help.
I like to use the longest sanding block feasible for a panel. Also I prefer to use blocks that don't flex on the flat surfaces.
You will want to remove all the filler the other guy put on there. Being exposed to the elements it no doubt has absorbed moisture and contaminants.
When block sanding use a coarse grit to get things straight. The biggest mistake most beginners make is pressing too hard on the sanding block and flexing the panels. This may not be noticeable to you at the time but you will find yourself reapplying filler over and over again on the same area and not getting any satisfactory results.
Change the sand paper as soon as it stops cutting (you will feel like you are wasting it) rather than pushing harder on the block.

I use Marson Platinum filler (not the plus) but Rage and others are good as well. You will find the cheaper ones sand like concrete.
Try to work the dents and patches so that you use as little filler as possible to get things straight. Apply the filler well past the dent area and when you think you have it right apply a skim coat of filler and then guide coat and black sand to make sure.

Once the entire car has been prepped and sanded you can apply a couple of coats of epoxy primer.


Is there a certain blocking kit that comes with an assortment of different lengths I would commonly need?

What grit should I start with to remove any peeling clear and to scuff the already applied primer? Should I be using a DA on this first scuffing of the car before I spray epoxy primer? Or should I only use a DA to grind down the filler that the guy applied?

If I start sanding on the car in its current state(before me spraying a coat of primer), will that allow for me to apply filler or do I need to:

scuff everything
remove the old filler
spray primer
then sand and apply filler as needed?

Sry for the millions of questions

Is this a good blocking kit? http://www.amazon.com/Autobody-Dura-Blo ... +block+kit



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:15 pm
Welcome, it's an exciting time of any project... Imagining what if might be

A lot of you questions are answered in the general articles for newbies on this Page http://www.autobody101.com/content/auto ... -articles/
If you haven't read them I highly recommend you do, if you have, read 'em again as there is a wealth of knowledge there, too much to be absorbed in one reading.

re. Sanding blocks, I highly recommend dura blocks as well, you can get them in sets of 6 or 7 with all of the sizes you need.

Remove the filler that is there, clean & prepsol (or equivalent) the raw metal then seal with epoxy primer, that will protect it from moisture & you can apply filter over it when the time comes.

Best of luck with the project
Matt



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2014 4:37 pm
So whats the best option for me to heat my garage. I already have a Unit Heater I can use, or a radiant tube heater.

Unit heater has no duct work but has an open flame and a blower fan to push air around.
-benefits:

Easy to mount
Quicker heat

Negatives:
Blows air around so could cause dust to get into the paint, although I kinda plan to have it on the otherside of the plastic sheets I want to hang in my garage to make a booth, or to just protect the garage walls. So maybe it won't get anything in he paint if I set it up a certain way.

Radiant Tube Heater:
Pros: doesnt blow air around
Has a flame but its not open to the environment as much as the unit heater.

Cons:

Harder to install, have to hang almost 30' ft of tubing.

Takes a little longer to heat the garage, might not be as even of a heat since once I turn it off everything will still be hot and radiating.

Takes up more space


I just don't know which one to pick. I'm leanin towards the unit heater because it will be easier to install



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 7:26 pm
I'm probably going to go the unit heater route.

Besides that, I'm in the process of running 230v to my attached garage.

My kitchen which is on the otherside of the wall from the garage used to have an electric stove, so it had a 220 line for it thats no longer needed. I decided since my garage already has outlets and some lighting that I'm just going to use the old kitchen 230 line, pull it back into the basement and drill a hole into the garage and run it that way. Any thoughts on this?

Thx



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:37 pm
Some slow progress, I removed the bumpers and cracked bumper fillers, also the grill.

Image


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2014 7:16 pm
So I bought a 6" neumatic hand sander DA, it has the hook and loop style backing pad, can anyone recommend a good brand of sand paper for this sander? Where's the best place to buy them from?



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 5:55 pm
I removed my window trims and found this red primer like stuff? Any idea of what this is? Is it factory primer?
Someone told me some 80's cars had some type of sealer on them that made it very hard to not fish eye, and he said to use a fish eye eliminator? I don't know if this is what the guy is talking about.

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