1966 Mustang bodywork and paint help

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 2:56 am
I'm looking to get some advice or tips on finishing up some body work.

Long story short, I purchased the mustang with a lot of bodywork complete (The car was chemically dipped...epoxy coated...sheet metal replaced...and primered?), unfortunately the owner lost interest and the car sat in a garage for a few years, until I picked it up for a decent price. The car does have some small dings and dents from moving and storage, I have attempted some body work on it, but I may I have to use some extra filler to cover up my mess.

Can I put filler over the primer?
Does the primer need to blocked?


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I did my best to keep the gaps at 3/16. I welded some of the edging on the passenger side to close up the gap. They seemed a little off when I got the car.
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I have spent hours to try and align all the gaps on the front end. How can I add edging to the fiberglass hood? The gap between the fender and the hood is way off.
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At one time or another the previous owner decided to put some speaker holes. I cleaned up the hole and welded a metal plate, not my best work. I know you're not suppose to use more than 1/8 inch of filler, but it's just a door right or should I remove and re-weld again?

It's hard to tell in the picture, but the repair is not as straight as the door.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:18 pm
Coming along nicely.

Since the epoxy primer as sat so long it will need to be sanded with 80 grit to provide some scratch before putting an filler on it.

You could scuff it with maroon scotch bright pad to get it dull and then shoot a fresh coat of epoxy over it. This will allow you to put filler directly over the epoxy without sanding first.

Once you get it the body patches done I would clean it well and shoot 2-3 coats of 2k build primer. Let that cure and then block sand with a coarse grit to get your panels straight. Use as long a sanding block as practical on each panel and remember not to press too hard on the block. You want to take most of the 2k off so it just fills the low spots and then epoxy primer starts showing through.

Shoot 2 more coats of 2k and then use guide coat and block sand with 180 -220 until the guide coat is gone. From there you can begin wet sanding with 400 followed by 600. I like to use guide coat when wet sanding as well.
1968 Coronet R/T


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:49 am
Thanks for the response. Do you think, it would be a problem if I lay more than an 1/8 inch body filler to the area I patched up on the door?

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:15 am
Are you talking about the patch on the bottom of the door?

I would continue welding that in and not leave any gaps or open seams.

Similar to this:
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You will use much less filler and reduce the risk of it cracking - especially on a door that gets opened and closed repeatedly.

Today's brand name fillers are much better quality and can be applied thicker than the old Bondo. That being said, I strive to keep filler use to a minimum and suggest staying under a 1/4" thick.
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2017 2:06 pm
I filled in the gaps with the welder and I didn't notice that the patch I welded was kind of sunk in. I was thinking of trying to hammer it out, but it's hard to get a good hammer grip behind there.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 11:44 am
"I have spent hours to try and align all the gaps on the front end. How can I add edging to the fiberglass hood? The gap between the fender and the hood is way off"

youre probably going to have to learn some fiberglassing techniques.
lookin like a sweet build. hope ya keep pictures of the progress comin.

im not sure how much sheet metal welding experience ya have, but it is definitely a time to practice patience. getting the metal too hot and the patch or surround metal can warp,buckle, and/or do all kinds of crazy stuff.



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:58 am
To 'raise' a low section of metal, you can put a dolly behind it, and use a slapper to bring it up. A hammer will work, too, but it is a bit harder to use.
A slapper is a file or flat piece of steel that's about 6-8 in long, an inch or 1 1/2" wide. Shaped into a soft 'Z' shape so you can whack it flat up against the metal. Spreads the impact over a larger area than a hammer.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2017 10:19 am
I asked the same question about adding onto a fiberglass hood a few years ago. Do some reading in the fiberglass forum, lots of great info there. I had the same issue with my fiberglass hood for my 65 Stang. As I recall I just roughed up the gel coat a few inches back and then laid some mat on working further and further back with sanding in between layers. Alos flipped it over and tried to tie it together from that side. Really not hard at all to do. I got the gap perfect but the arch of the hood from front to back was way higher in the middle than the fenders so I gave up on the glass hood. It was glass over steel so not much I could do about the way they built it unless I cut the steel out of it and tried to flatten the frame. Didn't want that aggrevation. Adding a half inch of spacers under the mid point of the fenders would look like crap with the hood open so I went back to the original hood
Rob



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 09, 2017 1:32 am
Thanks for all the replies and help. I'm blocking the body as "'68 Coronet R/T" suggested. Hopefully I'm doing it right, I have seen a few youtube videos, especially the ones from Eastwood, which have been a great help. I will have to add some pictures once I get some more progress going.


I have the same issue with the hood being arched. I tried adding some weight to try and straighten it out, but it wasn't working. So I decided to add the some weight and leave the hood out in the sun to see if it helped, sure enough the arch became flatter. But, I'll probably leave the fiberglass stuff till the end.



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 12:27 pm
Its been a while since I posted here, time and money only permit me to work so much on the car. I think I am ready to spray. I have blocked it and wet sanded it with 320 grit.

I need some advice on the next steps. I have some burn through in various parts.

Do I spot prime and sand all the exposed metal?

Or, do I spray a thin coat of sealer and then base and clear coat?

I have been working on this car for 7 years, money has always been a factor. I'm open to suggestions, but my plan is to purchase the TCP Global - Restoration Shop (UBLV - URETHANE BASECOAT) and PPG DCU 2021 clear coat.

Any suggestions for sealer or for this project?

Looking to paint as the 2003 Mustang Azure Blue.
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