Newbie 1969 torino gt Cobra Jet

Show off your work! Anything from final results to full start-to-finish project journals.



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 1:10 pm
Figured out how to get pics on right. Now more sanding, more sanding , more sanding.
Attachments
DSCN4262.JPG
IMG_0527 (2).JPG
IMG_0522.JPG
IMG_0519 (2).JPG
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 1:16 pm
Wabigoon wrote:Just my opinion on welders. Like most people just starting, bought a welder form Harbour Fright, and watched all the videos on YouTube. Most of the time you see someone make two or three spot welds on a thicker plate and then say just fill in the rest. These machines are not designed to weld thin sheet metal. We borrowed a friends welder (230 volt Hobart with gas and .24 wire.) Even this machine is at it's limits welding sheet metal that is probably 19 gauge or less after cleaning and sanding. Trade welders may be able to make them work but your average hobbyist would have hard time pulling off 200 stich welds to complete a job.


Didnt take you long to figure that one out lol I have a couple of Migs I dont like using them on thin sheet metal at all!!!!
I like Using Gas welders I have a very small Gas rig By Meco with a Gas shut off valve and Pilot light works very nice and I also use Tig Welders both work much better better than any Mig Cleaner nicer welds and the Bead can be metal worked by Hammer and Dolley unlike a Mig weld bead which is rock hard and cant be metal worked easily.

This is an extremely small Torch very light smaller than pack of smokes fits in Palm of your hand makes Tig weld precision welds only with Gas.

https://www.tinmantech.com/products/wel ... -torch.php

https://www.tinmantech.com/products/wel ... cessories/

This is really cool part
The Economizer !!!!!!! This lets you weld stop hang up torch which shuts off gas Oxy and and acetylene flow but keeps a Pilot light going! to pick it back up relight torch.
This is Great for Hammer welding.
https://www.tinmantech.com/products/wel ... mizers.php

This is the right way to weld Thin sheet metal on body panels.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rv5bKXJ3kEM
Dennis Barnett
A&P Mechanic, FCC General radio Telephone Operator
Line Maintenance A&P Mechanic and MOC Tech specialist.



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:16 pm
Going to repair the trunk lid, some shots of my attempt at it. Pic look worse than it is. Coming out not to bad. Doing it in sections so I can keep the contour right. New welder works great. Will show some more pics later.
Attachments
DSCN4283.JPG
New welder works great
DSCN4279.JPG
Edge welded to trunk and bent around lip and pinched
DSCN4274.JPG
bottom lip tacked on
DSCN4272.JPG
Front edge and lip cut out
DSCN4271.JPG
Getting ready to start



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 3:01 pm
Trunklid coming along.
Attachments
DSCN4297.JPG
DSCN4294.JPG



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 11:33 am
Some pics of the front end parts. left side is ready to go with all new parts needed. Torque box and shock tower repaired. Right side is in great condition. Just need some cleanup and new parts. Kind of jumping around fixing it but when I get tired of doing one thing I do something else. Took apart the heater box and found this.
Attachments
DSCN4342.JPG
Right side
DSCN4335.JPG
Left side
DSCN4353.JPG
ac/heater box

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 4:27 pm
I would add only that you photo document everything before you disassemble it.
When taking a car apart I take pictures of each item paying attention to how it was installed, where the wires were run, shims, length of bolts and placement. Then I bag and tag it all.
My method is heavy duty zip lock bags and a piece of paper inside with the necessary details.
I also keep an inventory list on a spreadsheet and note whether an item needs to be refurbished or replaced.
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 5:21 pm
'68 Coronet R/T wrote:I would add only that you photo document everything before you disassemble it.
When taking a car apart I take pictures of each item paying attention to how it was installed, where the wires were run, shims, length of bolts and placement. Then I bag and tag it all.
My method is heavy duty zip lock bags and a piece of paper inside with the necessary details.
I also keep an inventory list on a spreadsheet and note whether an item needs to be refurbished or replaced.


That's what works for me too. I also, keep a disassembly journal and write down what I did each day/date I work on it. I store the parts from that day in totes and label the totes with that days date. That way, when I need to find a part, all I have to do is find the tote for that day and the part will be inside.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 5:49 pm
Heater boxes are known for surprises.
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:33 am
'68 Coronet R/T wrote:I would add only that you photo document everything before you disassemble it.
When taking a car apart I take pictures of each item paying attention to how it was installed, where the wires were run, shims, length of bolts and placement. Then I bag and tag it all.
My method is heavy duty zip lock bags and a piece of paper inside with the necessary details.
I also keep an inventory list on a spreadsheet and note whether an item needs to be refurbished or replaced.


I have to get more organized at this myself all to often I Find myself asking myself OK Were did this go? or where the heck is?
I like assembly manuals when available they give you the info they used on the assembly line, All to often things have been redone by some on in the past and it wasn't done right when you tore it apart! or they used the wrong hardware to put it back together.

For instance on my Pontiac the "Assembly manual" tells you what "color" and "size" clips to use to hold the fuel lines and Brake lines where under the car.
My 70 Pontiac has seen 50 years of road service The color of the clips that hold these lines has long since faded away but I can Glass bead them re-Plate in Zinc and Paint them the correct color and reinstall the correct size and color in the correct locations for a factory correct look by referencing the Assembly manual.

A factory Assembly manual is an invaluable tool, although sometimes lacking in detail pictures of taking things apart is just as invaluable as the book itself.
Dennis Barnett
A&P Mechanic, FCC General radio Telephone Operator
Line Maintenance A&P Mechanic and MOC Tech specialist.



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2018 12:15 pm
Repair of seat support. Both sides needed new ones. Since they make parts for it I think everyone is rusted.
Attachments
DSCN4359.JPG
Marked for cut out
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Adjust support, put in place
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Welded support
DSCN4364.JPG
Top patch in place and welded
DSCN4367.JPG
Filled sanded painted
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