Back in the day...

Show off your work! Anything from final results to full start-to-finish project journals.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 9:39 am
So the Chevy on the stands is your current project?
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 12:58 pm
Years ago gimped from a surgery, I spent some time scanning photo's from film to digital format. My depository of pictures allows me to walk down memory lane with ease as a result.
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The 66 on stands is still around, but it's not on my list presently. It's been out of service and languishes as a result of another long story attached to my life.

It did however end up being a car I learned a lot from. Rebuilt my first motor. Disc brake conversion, and full repaint.
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These pictures were taken yesterday. I'm not kidding when I say snow puts a dampener on things.
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This is out side. Inside it's cluttered. Could be a sign of a cluttered mind, or it could be a sign of one man trying to do too much?

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Truth is, it's both. In the fall I stripped a truck down and just haven't got around to dealing with the after effects. The result of nickel and dime grinding to keep this hobby affordable when you don't have deep pockets to always buy what you need. So I stripped the truck and salvaged parts. The motor and trans went in another Chevelle project, seat are in the coupe, things like wiring, fasteners, now removed are slowly being dealt with. Clean and stored, dressed and sold, or destined for scrap and recycle. It takes time and some effort, but I have not just one on the go, I've got 4 actual project cars going together.

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I know it's not ideal for working. It's cramped, cluttered and a heck of a overwhelming mess. But I know what I have, where most of it is, and when needed, how to arrange things so I can do what I do best, which is weld.

There was a time when I didn't think much or far about to many things. That's not now, that was back in the day.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 1:29 pm
It starts with an idea and sometimes that's where it ends? I'm a big advocated of trying.
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Ever stretch a frame?
How about a Corvette frame to fit a 66 Chevelle wheel base?

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19"...Granted it's not every boys dream, but if you've got nothing to loose in trying why not?

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I mentioned previously I got lots on the go, well, I could do a serious write up on just this small portion and what I learned along the way. The motor/trans I pulled from the truck I wrecked/salvaged out found a temporary home in the Corvette frame rails, for now anyways. It's actually destined to go into my van at some point, or the fuel injection and computer controlled transmission will. I got plans.

So, while not against fancy shops building nice cars, I just build with what I have and where I can, because that what boys did back in the day.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 1:54 pm
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Some called it a wreck,to much damage to far gone...I said I can fix it. I saw potential.
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Damage is from a moose
Car spun around and was rear ended.

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Ok, I admit there wasn't much good left when it was all taken apart, but as always there is more back story to the purchase. Having nothing to loose was a good reason to do it.
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Admittedly, I'm into this for around $7 grand. $1500 was in the screwing I took at Edmonton Frame doubting my work. The rest was in the car as seen with all the extras that came with it, $2000. The 91 Corvette chassis, $650, around $1600 in repo parts to rebuild the body. I spent paying for glass beading, hardware and paint product, welding consumables and a $250 C-4 of 84 vintage which has provided the tank and some missing back end hard ware.


All done on the drive way, under a lean to trap covering weather permitting. Just like back in the day.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 3:38 pm
wow :pcorn:
Home of Y Block Ministries
Milford, Ohio

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 6:14 pm
Hot Rod Reverend wrote:wow :pcorn:


Best line yet = "Damage is from a moose"
Sent by the random thoughts from the voices in my head...

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 7:46 pm
Some where in a file on my computer I have pictures of what had been recovered white factory buckets, now stained with broken glass, caramelized blood and moose hair. The car as purchased came with two full quarter panels, a 4 speed console and pedals, a repo hood and louvers and the weather strip to redo the car. Not to mention emblems, door hinge rebuild kits and window fuzzes.
I'm sure looking at it you're probably shaking your head but for the money, it was a good deal.
I sold the bucket seats, automatic console and recouped 1/2 my out lay of cash. I've learned never sell a back seat however.
With the car not being numbers special, and me not worried about retirement, seemed a no brainer?

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Buddy hit the moose at highway speeds. Neither saw it coming. Took the legs right out from under it, across the hood, crushing the "A" pillar, windshield and roof. Force of impact (?) spun the car around, buddies friend flew out the passenger door not wearing the seat belt when it popped open, car gets rear ended. So I was told. I was all ears hearing the story.

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I've been asked a few times, why didn't I just have the frame pulled? Good question?
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Honest answer was It wasn't my intention to fix it. Hostile take over. Buy, strip and sell parts. Fund the hobby for cheap. I actually had a 96 Salvage corvette (another story) I was originally planning on doing something with and at the time it was dragged home and they sat side by side I thought, hmm? The cheap frame hauled home came after. I still have the extra vette though?


Lots of work taking a car apart...I'm not sure why, I'm thinking it's a minor autistic thing, but I found myself constantly counting as I drilled spot welds?


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I learned along the way to pick my battles. Some parts, while available as reproduction, I chose to fix and save a buck, keeping with low dollar high quality. At this point, I'm starting to strip it down. Digging in deep but thinking I could pull the pin knowing the neighbors would be thinking, he's finally come to his senses? I kept drilling. But I said, what have I got to loose?
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I had still thought of just rebuilding the body and finding another frame. When I ordered my repo panels, I purchased accordingly to that train of thought. I doubt I'll be using the wheel tubs and trunk kit. The rest will come in handy however. I have a 4 door Chevelle stashed for another conversion?
Doing it the long way and the hard way maybe, but it still gets in done. Just like back in the day.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 12:28 am
Play around with the same cars and you discover they all develop the same problem areas. 66/67 Chevelle's, the bottoms of front fender are one of those spots. Looking at cars it's one of the first places I look and judge condition, repairs, body filler. Tell tales signs because lets face it, no one bends over to look, or sand to hide well repairs in that area.
Faced with needed repairs, I looked at my options and settled on making my own after finding the one poor quality repo patch panel that was available, was poorly stamped resulting in poor fitment. A nice way of say waste of money and end up being returned.
But it was a start. The prod needed to make it happen.

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I'm sure some would have used it. I chose not to thinking I could do better. I seem to go thru a lot of folders and tape making templates, doing better.
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With all fenders (3) having been touched before my fingers, I used a combination of references for final trimming. Assuming a mirror image, left and right, I started cutting pieces. The recessed stamping was a bit of a challenge. But it didn't take much to over come it and it was done cheaply.


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I have a few pieces of equipment that make cutting sheet metal easier. The use of templates ensured repeatability. I'm usually a steady worker and all in about 2 days of work. Including that stamping Jig.

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Before the days of repo panels, GMAW...I'm sure this repair was a bit more effort and hiding the problem was common, and is what most now are dealing with.
Modern tooling has brought about better stampings, while technology has all but killed the die makers industry, selection for a lot of cars/trucks is available for a price.
I couldn't afford the price.
With the affordable stock of replacement good used dried up, the replacement cost for new repo very expensive, I choose plan "B" and It worked out very well indeed.

I used the tools available to do the best I could. Cause that's what you did, back in the day.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:14 am
Maybe I should have shown what it looked like at the start? This was the worst in appearance.


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Holes didn't just find themselves, Carefully transfer out to one, they were stacked, taped, marked for location and punched. It made short work drilling and trimming the slot after, all ended up the same.

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Although I had made and marked out for a full size patch, only one of three was full size. Guess which one?
They all end up fully welded with GMAW, welds ground and looking the same in the end. Inches are inches, I didn't see a need to go past sound metal to make a point of more work then necessary or added expense.
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Same for the problem areas at the front. It got so easy... I was beginning to think I could make a buck fixing fenders?

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Of course, I like most eventually find myself covering that bare metal in epoxy primer. Layed them out on saw horses and 2x4's. Flip and repeat, wrap and store. Getting it done slowly on the affordable pay as you go plan, just like back in the day.
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