Dodge Charger Truck Build

Show off your work! Anything from final results to full start-to-finish project journals.

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 5647
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 7:00 pm
Location: central Ohio
Country:
USA
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2021 10:43 pm
They are just "eyeballed" roughly about an inch apart. You really don't have to be that specific with them. The heat of the blade kind of "melts" out a much wider trough than the blade width. The idea is to just get the foam to flex. They about 3/4 s the depth of the foam. You don't want any deeper than that..... This week I'll get into "locking" the shape to prepare for the fabric work...
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 8410
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 8:15 am
Sorry for all the questions but wouldn't superglue or something like that be better than filler to hold the shape?
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 5647
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 7:00 pm
Location: central Ohio
Country:
USA
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 9:31 am
Yes, you can use super glue, but you would be using a lot to really get it to "lock." I also like to do this initial lock while it is in place like this. Bondo type filler is just cheap and fast and also clings quite nicely. I'd be filling out the end of those kerfs anyway.
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 5647
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 7:00 pm
Location: central Ohio
Country:
USA
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 12:02 am
So, wing, part 2. I got my shape pretty much where I wanted it and finished getting the shape stiff enough to work with. The pictures tell it all here. Progress has been good and I am learning how this works. For those of you that have worked with fiberglass products this is a completely new learning curve. You have to be constantly aware of the "weave" pattern which can easily move/shift. I came up with a couple of things that helps with that....
Attachments
IMG_20210124_154223738.jpg
So we left off with getting those saw kerfs locked up. I had some left over epoxy so I shove that up in there, left it dry/cure for a bit and then turned it back over and let it cure the rest of the way in place.
IMG_20210129_152636811.jpg
So flipped it back over, yeah, nice and stiff....ready for some more work....
IMG_20210129_152659405.jpg
So I just filled up those kerf cuts the rest of the way with body filler and then came up with this....Peel and stick felt from the hobby shop.. A sheet at each end over those curves will help the carbon fiber fabric lay down and "grip" as it dries.
IMG_20210129_154620450.jpg
Big tip here...whatever you are laying a dark colored fabric over should be just blacked out with paint. Nothing fancy just an aerosol black from the hardware store should work. Next you will applying the next "tip" I got when plowing through videos. See that orange can? That is headliner contact cement. Spray it on only one surface and let it get tacky.
IMG_20210129_161844952.jpg
And now we will cut the carbon fiber. Okay, so this stuff laughs at heavy duty scissors and doesn't even want to do well with my aviator shears. The answer is this rotary cutter. You can find them online for $40 to $100. They are cordless and worth their weight in gold.
IMG_20210129_161849740.jpg
So to cut this stuff use that blue hardware masking tape. Lightly tape it over in the middle of where you will mark your line, use a sharpie to draw your line, and finally run the cutter down that line. CAREFULLY pull the tape back off. If you pull too hard you'll start unraveling the fibers!
IMG_20210129_165233973.jpg
Here we have placed the fabric in place as the contact cement firmly holds it for our next epoxy work.
IMG_20210129_172140666.jpg
And here we have the stuff fully wetted out. I'll leave it like this under infra red to harden up somewhat and then add another clear layer of epoxy. This is called a "wet" on "wet" application. This gives those 2 epoxy layers a strong chemical bond and they flow together and cure.
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

User avatar

Top Contributor
Posts: 1666
Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 4:46 am
Location: Canberra
Country:
Australia
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 1:09 am
:pcorn: :goodjob:
Chris

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 5647
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 7:00 pm
Location: central Ohio
Country:
USA
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 9:36 am
Ha, ha, and we thank you for your support...... as we learn and possibly screw up new things....
:knockout:
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 8410
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 9:03 pm
Hey, at least your letting others like me learn with you! :worthy: :worthy:
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 5647
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 7:00 pm
Location: central Ohio
Country:
USA
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 10:41 pm
So we are supposed to get somewhat of a snow storm tonight. Wife agreed to help me align the top piece tomorrow.....fingers crossed on getting the weave down straight. The spray contact glue helps a lot with that....
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 5647
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 7:00 pm
Location: central Ohio
Country:
USA
PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2021 5:45 pm
So we got about 5 inches of snow, plowed all the drives out here, cup of coffee, minor nap....back to the wing. So did you ever think that you made so many mistakes you could just write a book on How Not To Do This! Well, that was me, fortunately I had thought far enough ahead to allow for problems. So, I blacked out the top side, did some light sanding underneath, sprayed a layer of sticky glue and started shaping the fabric to the top surface while pulling it and wrapping it around the edges. Take a look at the pics. and I'll explain along with minor insertions of stupidity now and then...

And now I know why guys do vacuum bagging on parts like this. Don't get me wrong you can do some pretty serious lay up this way.... however when you start getting multiple curves/shapes you are going to have trouble securing things in place while your epoxy kicks. I had brains enough to plan ahead in trouble spots so it didn't bite me in the butt too much but bagging would have been a no brainer. And the fun continues......
Attachments
IMG_20210131_145141961.jpg
So somebody asked me why I use headliner adhesive for the contact cement here. Well, I'm "wrapping" this fabric around the edge so when it is in this position the fabric needs to stay "up" just like the headliner in your car does. I think it works well in this application.
IMG_20210131_150326787.jpg
So I cut a nice wide piece of the fabric and start lightly pushing and pulling it into place as I press it down. Again, minor stupid point....KEEP WATCHING THE WEAVE...you get so carried away just pressing it down you can get lost on that. No, problem though....the glue is only applied to one surface so you can pickup and lay it down if needed.
IMG_20210131_151512839.jpg
So everything is pressed into place. Even at this point the fabric laid down better than I thought it could. I was expecting to cut some relief points here and there, didn't need them (might have helped somewhat though.)
IMG_20210131_161957131.jpg
Okay, fully applied and wetted out with epoxy. Here comes stupid....DON'T POUR EPOXY DIRECTLY ON THE FABRIC SURFACE! Why, because it will cause a "push" in the fabric and make it bunch. Solution, two bricks and a small board as a lever to slightly flex the center up and push out the bunch area. Second solution that was the final fix there..... used an upholstery needle to punch some invisible holes in the bunches as well, net result-no more bunches.....
Okay, last stupid thing, let the tacky glue dry for an hour before moving on the epoxy. The glue can cause minor bubbling in the fabric. The fix in my case was to just heat the area with a heat gun (hair dryer would work as well) forcing the bubbling out and allowing the fabric to lay down right.
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!



Fully Engaged
Posts: 273
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2017 7:36 am

Country:
USA
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2021 8:31 am
Looking good so far!
PreviousNext

Return to Completed & In Progress Member Projects

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: DarrelK, slednut and 10 guests