transitioning between panels with pearls and candies

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2017 10:48 pm
With candies and pearls its really important to have the same amount of paint over the entire surface. At the edges of a car obviously transitioning from one surface plane to another isn't overly difficult to imagine because you just run past the end of the panel and then reposition for the next panel. But I'm curious how you do that where two surfaces meet at a perpendicular (or even near perpendicular) inside angle, such as where a deuce coupe roof meets the trunk deck. Or a big 60's car where the rear roof pilar meets the top of the quarter panel. That's actually a bigger challenge because as you come up the quarter panel and start to overlap the edge you have the top of the quarter panel as a horizontal surface and the rear roof pillar is about 4 to 6 inches further away from the gun as you get above the quarter panel. There are probably lots of places where this technique would be needed, I just haven't thought of them yet. House of Kolor's recommendation for overlap with candies (or in their case Kandies) is 75% so it takes 3 passes to get off the edge of a panel. Do you just tip the gun 25%, 50%, 75% as you go into the corner or does that change the distance from the cup to the panel too much?
I'd love to see a video of how a pro does this.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 10:19 am
well you are correct in your facts of getting off a panel. big mistake painters make is coming to a bottom or top edge and not using that last % of the fan pattern same as the rest of the car got. as far as your question about the kandy and how to do a inside (90 degree?)
would be hard for me to type it out. some are easier than others due to kandy color and base color. i might spray so my pattern is horizontal with the angle.
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 5:13 am
As Dave said, sometimes it is harder to describe a process, than do it, after years of experience. Going into inside curves can be tricky when doing candies. Depending on how large and area it is, and the degree of curvature, you need to modify your spray technique. The only way you are going to know how, is with experience, and by carefully watching how the paint goes on, in the first couple critical coats.
An inside curve is going to capture more paint, as the outside of the paint fan is going to be closer than the center ( so more paint top and bottom of your pattern). So, you might want to back off a bit, and keep your 75% overlap, or transition the overlap to 50% in that area. Or tighten your patter so it isn't putting the paint on unevenly. If it's a real problem area, you may want to switch, back and forth, from a straight pattern, to going 90* across it, so you don't' develop the dreaded 'tiger striping'. The old books gave this as routine painting pattern for Candy.
Watch how wet you spray (and how fast it dries) , too, as the candy will 'pool' if it is sprayed too wet, and settles into the concave areas.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 8:33 am
Definitely agree with everything said here so far it does indeed just come down to "experience". I came here to this forum many, many years ago specifically to get help in spray metallics and candy work. I found out I already had a ton of experience doing this because..... I was a furniture refinisher. We have to shoot tints, toners, clears all the time inside cabinets and obviously I was used to angling, backing out my gun, and criss crossing as needed to get the "look" that I needed. I think that's it right there too....don't get so hung up on technique that you are going to read about but try to get some panel practice on some simple inside corner shapes. Yeah, a video would probably be helpful but most guys that are good at this are moving pretty fast in these areas. I've done wood restoration spray demos for manufacturers and the people seeing me do the inside corners, shapes, etc., are always going back and asking me, "Now what exactly are the steps for doing that???....
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:20 am
Even when trying to teach someone the proper way to do some things, I skip over important steps, or techniques, Not because I want to, but it becomes so ingrained in the behavior, that you do it unconsciously. Just this weekend I was explaining this problem with a friend. He used to "set up" a custom paint job for his boss, sometimes. Last coat of primer, sealer, maybe candy basecoat. I told him that when I do one, I actually WANT to do the rep-candy work, even if it tires me out by the end of the paint job. While doing these steps, I begin to plan out my passes, watching how the paint hits the panels, esp. in trouble areas. I work out the discipline to do the passes evenly when doing the metallic base, so when it's time for candy, I've got it all worked out. Less mistakes made, but it's something you really don't think about.



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 6:34 am
Chop makes a good point. By the third time you spray something (primer, sealer, base, effects) you know where the problem areas are and have your passes worked out.

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