SATA Spray Equipment

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2019 12:48 pm
Thought i would share with you guys some info on SATA guns in particular but the principles apply to all spray equipment. Just thought some may find it interesting.


I Recently tested a Sagola for a friend, some of you know by the name "OldFatBald" my opinion is it was not the right gun for me. why ? Well simply because it does not match the flow rates i am use to. NO it is not a bad gun, very nice actually, very well built, knobs are precise, and easy to maintenance. in my opinion if i matched up the flow rates from one gun to another it would perform better for me.

This is a mistake most painters make because they do not understand one gun manufacture to the next. SATA spray equipment does not measure their size tip in MM, they just name it to whats close.
they have a target flow rate and the tip size varies to get that flow rate. So for me to like a Sagola it would take getting the flow rates of their guns and matching it to what i like in SATA, only then will the gun feel comfortable to me and give me the "feel" im looking for. because a 1000 dollar gun does not spray nice unless it feels good to you. i hear a lot of gun bashing or paint sucks comments on forums and the truth is the people making those statements just are usually just lacking education. Maybe they expect a 1.3 SATA RP to Spray like a Iwata 1.3 HVLP ? Thanks for reading



Here is a quote from a good friend at SATA

June 17, 2019
SATA has a few different premium Topcoat guns. They have a range of nozzle sets, and flow rates that increase as the fluid tip name gets bigger. SATA fluid nozzles don’t necessarily match the name in mm. The fluid nozzles are not measured in mm, but are merely named to be relative to that size. This is especially true when talking HVLP. In HVLP, we have only 10 psi at the aircap. Thus the air blowing across and sucking the paint out of the fluid tip is low. When this happens the fluid tip is slightly larger to get the proper flow rate.
In the SATAjet 5000 B, we have both HVLP and RP guns. HVLP is 10 psi aircap pressure. RP stands for reduced pressure. By reduced pressure it means if you put 29 psi into the gun, about 22 psi comes out of the aircap, giving a slightly higher gun speed than HVLP. It is usually a more focused fan, giving faster wetting as well.
In the SATAjet 5000 B the HVLP range is 1.0, 1.2, WSB, 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, 1.9 & 2.2
In the SATAjet 5000 B RP the range is 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, 2.0 & 2.5 poly
The fluid flow rate gets faster as you go up the scale in either. This may be very necessary when spraying in hot conditions, or when spraying larger surfaces where you need to get even wetting across large flat surfaces, and keep good gun speed. The larger nozzle size can also help in many cases when spraying fleet colors, particularly flat or matte gloss colors on larger surfaces.
In your shop in Denver, it seems you spray a variety of paint from DBC to Global, EHP and Delfleet. Typically the Delfleet likes a bit larger tip.
In the 5000 I would probably shoot a 1.4 HVLP or a 1.3 RP for DBC, and Global.
In the 5000 I would spray a WSB HVLP for EHP, moving up to a 1.3 on hotter days.
In Delfleet I would shoot an RP with a 1.4, or on larger surfaces move to a 1.6 to get a wide, wet pattern.
All of the above color would start at about 26 psi. When hotter, go down in pressures.

For clear, with slower clears, typically you can spray around 26 psi too. For faster clears, start at 22, and go down even lower for hot temps.

In the new SATAjet X 5500
SATA has changed the nozzles to have options. In each size, from 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5 there are both I shape and O shape fans.
The difference is the I shaped fans help to spread the wet center out closer to the ends of the fan, providing a taller more narrow fan, which is especially beneficial with waterborne paint. It helps the colors to be even, and improves flash times. This nozzle is also a more “controlled” paint speed, and helps to prevent striping if overlaps are not 100% accurate, and is a bit more flexible in gun distance from the panel.
The O shaped fans are slightly shorter in fan height, but wider, with the wet center being more centered, for a faster wetting and work speed. This is liked by painters who love to move fast, paint closer to the panel, and have good overlap, usually in the 75% overlap range or higher.

With DBC, the standard is either the 1.4 in HVLP, or 1.3 in RP. Most often the O nozzle is preferred for DBC Solvent base, but some who want to paint a little slower prefer the I nozzle.
With EHP waterborne, the SATAjet X 5500 HVLP 1.3I is the new standard recommended by the PPG Gun Club on their new Gun chart. (attached in this e-mail). They offer a smaller 1.2O, but usually used in higher humidity areas. The 1.3 I HVLP has proven best across the USA in various climates. Recommended pressures are 23-26 PSI for coverage coats, and 16-18 for the Control Coats. Higher end of the pressure range on more humid climate days.
If you want to use a SATAjet X 5500 RP, then go down to the 1.1I. The recommended air on this SATAjet X 5500 RP is from 24-28 PSI, and the control coat at 24-16 PSI.
The larger nozzles, 1.4 RP or 1.5 in HVLP work great in Solvent basecoats or single stage materials. When going with the “O” style nozzle it really makes wetting up a panel, especially larger ones easier.

SATAjet 1500 B SoLV.
We also have a gun specifically designed for spraying solvents. It is called the SATAjet 1500 B SoLV. This gun was designed to help wet up and control film build and metallics with solvent paint. It has a nice height fan, but is slightly wider, with a wet focus to help make film build even with solvent basecoats, single stage materials or clearcoats. It also sprays sealers very well.
This is available in both HVLP and RP, and only in 1.3 or 1.4 nozzle sets. For faster work speed, or larger surfaces the 1.4 is the best choice in either. Great flexibility in gun distance, low CFM and a super durable gun body make this a great choice for spraying solvent.

The SATAjet RP 1.3 and 1.4 are now listed as the preferred guns to spray PPG Delfleet One.

See pic below, pay attention to the flow rate of the 1.3 RP in 4000 and 5000
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SATA flow rate pic.jpg
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2019 4:58 am
:goodpost: So very true.

The trick is in finding a gun that suits your spraying style speed, distance etc.

For me that's not SATA but I'd never say that they're bad guns - just that my experience with them wasn't all that good. That said, I'd agree that I was probably trialling the wrong guns.

Interesting the comments about tip size not being entirely accurate. The same seems to have invaded the Devilbiss camp with the DV1 being just an approximation, or, rather, a point relative to other sizes.

I think that the important thing for most members here is that, at the top level anyway, there are no really bad guns. But they are all different and for those who have but a single gun, the key is much practice to refine technique and get to know how even small changes in gun settings can have a big impact on the final job.
Chris

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2019 7:48 am
That is all very interesting. I've always wondered about the tip size thing from gun to gun. It's little wonder it is hard to give advice from gun to gun especially for the novice shooters out there. It sounds like all we can be is "results" oriented with what guys achieve with their guns. Look at their work, tell them how adjustments can be made, and move on.................
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:57 pm
DarrelK wrote:That is all very interesting. I've always wondered about the tip size thing from gun to gun. It's little wonder it is hard to give advice from gun to gun especially for the novice shooters out there. It sounds like all we can be is "results" oriented with what guys achieve with their guns. Look at their work, tell them how adjustments can be made, and move on.................


Exactly Darrel, i do think its moving forward in a way that may or may not get more critical for the professional. But who knows maybe this can help a Hobbiest that had his hands on a sata but only wants to spend for a tekna, match up thos flow rates, he would probably be happy with his choice.
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SATA Spray Equipment Germany
Axalta ChromaBase Elite Standox Imron 5000 6000
PPG Delfeet Deltron Global Matthews
Sherwin Williams Ultra 7000 Genesis
Valspar DeBeer LIC
Akzo Nobel Sikkens Lesonal

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