Painting with 20 GAL Comp. rated at 13 CFM @ 40PSI

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2019 9:56 pm
Hello

My name Waid and new member on this forum.

I am looking to paint my old Falcon in my Garage. Most of the HVLP paint guns seems to require about 13 CFM @ 23 PSI inlet. I was thinking about buying entry level 60 gallon compressor like the one they are at Menards but its rated 3.7hp with 13.4 CFM @ 40 PSI. My old 6.5hp DeVilbiss Air Compressor is rated at 13 CFM @ 40 PSI but its only 20 gallons.

Is my old DeVilbiss adequate for HVLP paint guns?

Thank you,

Waid
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2019 11:00 pm
How about adding another tank to what you've already got? I think if you combo that up with maybe an LVLP gun you'd be okay and save some money.....
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 9:22 am
I agree that a 60 gallon would be the way to go but my small compressor has double the horsepower.

Can I simulate a test with a paint gun but without the paint and see how well it keeps up?

Thanks

Waid

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 9:23 am
Once you use the air in the tank the pump won't be able to keep up.
The higher the tank pressure, the less the pump puts out.
The compressor is pumping against a tank pressure of 125 PSI which
means it is making way less make-up air than even the 90 psi rating.
The 40 psi rating means nothing, the pump never pumps against that.
You could get buy for maybe 1 or two panels but not much more.
A conventional gun would go farther.
JC

(It's not custom painting-it's custom sanding)



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 6:39 pm
:goodpost: just a suggestion but why don't use a conventional type, gun or suction gun. like a Devilbiss JGA or MBC you can usually buy them cheep on eBay in like new condition. I've used them for years and they work perfect and don't require the high amount of air the gravity guns do.
Jay D.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:46 am
Conventional guns come in gravity and suction.
JC

(It's not custom painting-it's custom sanding)



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:11 pm
Air compressor ratings and stated specs are intentionally misleading and over exaggerated a business practice that continues in the air compressor industry to this day.

http://www.truetex.com/aircompressors.htm

With acceptable quality too Good quality Base coats hovering around the $400 a gallon mark and way way more in most cases for certain colors and or Name brands, And a complete paint job using good quality material's averages me $1500-$2500 per car.
I personally think it's a Major mistake too take a chance with all the inherent problems of an inadequate air supply.

Consistent steady clean water free Air supply is everything.
Its your money BUT an inadequate air supply or contaminated air supply is the cause of many a failed paint job attempt.

Learning any new skill is filled with trial and error Having to redo things is all part of learning curve, the causes of those failures need to be understood so you don't make the same mistake twice.

While everyone tries to get away with using a cheap quality tools now and then such as those sold by Harbor freight while it generally results in just a Broken tool because its of low quality but it generally works till it fails BUT using a Tool that's wholly inadequate for a job is asking for failure on an epic scale!
IF you had a Snap On 1/4" drive Torque wrench would you use it too torque the heads on an engine? Would you use a Snap On 3/8" ratchet to try to break Head bolts loose on a engine?
Probably not the best choices in the tool box inventory and why not????

Because there to small for the Job!
Dennis Barnett
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 5:42 pm
Very philosophical there, Dennis. But what you say is also very true.

Doright wrote:Air compressor ratings and stated specs are intentionally misleading and over exaggerated a business practice that continues in the air compressor industry to this day.

I'm still trying to reconcile OP's 6.5hp compressor with Ohm's Law in a 240V system. :shocked:

Doright wrote:IF you had a Snap On 1/4" drive Torque wrench would you use it too torque the heads on an engine?

I thought Snap-On was the duck's guts. Should I use Gearwrench instead? :knockout:
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:37 pm
NFT5 wrote:I'm still trying to reconcile OP's 6.5hp compressor with Ohm's Law in a 240V system. :shocked:


Hp rating dont mean much I am driving a 50 CFM pump with a 5 hp motor? :knockout:
It DONT like that pump though NOT at all!!!! :rotfl:
The motors days in this world are truly numbered! :flatten:
I really have to get a Proper size motor for my Pump soooon! :whoops:
Dennis Barnett
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