Looking to purchase Turbine Hvlp System

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2020 10:25 pm
Looking for some guidance in choosing a turbine hvlp system for finishing various projects. My projects include wood, metal, plastics, fiberglass and a couple of hot rod paint jobs a year. I spray with both waterborne and solvent based paints and clear coats and I am looking for a cost effective unit for these tasks. Have been researching Fugi, TP, Apollo, etc. and the different stages (single, two-five) and having a tough time making a decision.
I have read on this forum and others that some guys are successful with two stage units and other guys say four stage minimum. I do understand some of the limitations concerning the use of paint additives, due to air temp at the gun and viscosities that are not recommended for these systems and willing to deal with the learning curve.
My intent is to acquire a system to suit all of my needs. And I know that I have come to the right place for advice where professionals and dedicated hobbyists devote their time to helping others.
I had narrowed my search to Fugi and TP Tools Showtime 99 finisher and would certainly appreciate any advice and reviews of any other equipment available in that price range.
Thank you.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2020 11:45 pm
Welcome to the site.... So, okay....you already have some basic understanding of at least what these things are and how they work. To clarify further (this may help with your decision) turbine "compressors" are vacuum motors set up to use their output air for your gun air supply. The turbine housing consists of wheels (these are the stages which are stacked on top of each other) that each output about 1.5 to 2 psi. of pressure along with a lot of CFM (cubic feet of air movement). You will notice like that Showtime 99 is a 3 stage making 7.5 psi. which is excellent output for a 3 stage. When you get into other brands such as the Fuji you see that a 4 stage is up in the 8 to 9 psi. range with 5 stages going to the theoretical HVLP spec. cap pressure limits of nearly 10 psi.
This is just my opinion but I have been using (use to sell and even build systems) these for about 40 years now and this is what I would do....buy a unit with as many stages as you can afford. My pick would be a top of the line 5 stage Fuji. They are a good "system" capable of handling about the thickest of the high solids materials. The turbine motors are just about indestructible and the most that goes wrong with them are the brushes which are easy to replace. I have one of my old 3 stage units on the shelf that is 38 years old and had only had it's brushes replace once. That unit still puts out a solid 6 psi at the cap. Our wood shop currently uses the 4 stage version of that same Fuji turbine compressor and we shoot very high solids clears with it using little thinner reduction. The really nice features of the new Fuji turbine box design is the quieter running and cooler operating temp.s
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2020 1:21 am
Wow ! Can't ask for any reply time better than that. Thanks DarrelK for your quick reply and comprehensive answer to my question.
You have me thinking five stage Fugi for sure. Now of course it's not that easy. Now I have to choose spray gun type. Do you have any recommendations on gun type and pros and cons of the spray guns that are offered.
Thanks again DarrelK for taking the time to answer my questions. This forum is priceless.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2020 9:52 am
You are welcome on that..... and the gun thing.... Your design parameters for "systems" like this will should always be based on what will be the most difficult application. A weak point with turbine systems is that in a pressure/siphon design (old style cup "under" ) the quart cup is getting pressure to force liquid "up" the pickup tube. Sooooo....the thicker the material the more difficult it is for the more limited pressure of a turbine system to push that liquid. So, the solve for this is a no brainer....hence the gravity gun (cup over). In a turbine design you will usually see the gravity feed also supplemented with a pressure feed tube. My recommendation....gravity gun all the way because of the more modern thick liquids we are dealing with.... I think Fuji is currently offering at least 2 gravity guns that are worth looking at. First is the standard one T75 G. This is the most common I see guys using for automotive/industrial purposes. Now, if you want a little more "mobility" I would consider going with the 9600-G-XPC which gives you a gravity cup that swivels back as needed. If you get that I'd get the 600 cc model (about 20 oz.) There is just times that being able to move that cup would be awesome......
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2020 12:02 am
Thanks for the info. It is definitely helping me with my decision to purchase a system. I am now researching the different packages that are being offered and suppliers.
Also have been searching the internet for as much information regarding set-up, tutorials on technique, viscosities and air cap options and selection, additives, etc., etc.
Thanks again DarrelK for all your help.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2020 8:30 am
Smart.....keep doing that. Guys have a tendency to just jump off the "turbine spray cliff" without researching things. It's best to try and settle on a system and then settle on a vendor that knows what they are selling and can at least provide tech. support and troubleshooting. Even for me, it is tough to comment on tweeking systems much since system designs and materials are changing all the time. The "good" for you is that at least now we have more powerful turbines which makes the learning curve a lot easier.
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

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