Inner fender restoration advice

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2022 5:48 pm
This pretty much my first delve into the autobody world and am learning as I go. I have a 76 C20 Suburban that I am doing a partial restoration on. Currently I have the motor and transmission out and doing a rebuild. Once this was out it revealed some rust in the engine bay. So I decided to try my hand at an engine bay restoration. So far I have put about 4 hours of time into stripping rust and pain off the inner passenger fender. All of the various curves and angles are making it quite difficult. I have used an angle die grinder, sand paper by hand, and a aircraft paint stripper. Below are a couple pictures of what i am dealing with. They are a little dark but you can see areas around curves and underneath that are hard to get to. My question is there a more time efficient way to go about prepping this metal for filler and primer?

Matthew
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2022 7:35 pm
Yes, it's called media blasting.
Engine Compartment Left.JPG

Left Inner Fender.JPG


I use a pressure pot blaster, with crushed glass for media.
You can sweep it up, run it through a screen and reuse.

If you don't want any media going inside the car, be sure to tape or mask off any openings.

Once done, blow the car off with compressed air to be sure to remove media.
Generally, if you haven't touched the metal with your bare hands, it's ready for two coats of epoxy primer.

Engine Compartment Epoxy.JPG
1968 Coronet R/T


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2022 12:20 pm
Don't think I have enough compressor or funds at this time for a descent pot blaster. That will definitely be on the bucket list for the future. In the mean time are there any other tips for ways to get to tough areas by hand? Also maybe a dumb question but is it absolutely necessary to remove every single last bit of old material before priming? Thanks

Matthew

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2022 3:17 pm
They make a few small spot blasters that will work for the difficult areas. They have a small plastic tank on top to hold the media.

Then there are suction/syphon still guns with a hose that goes into your bag of media and draws it out while spraying.

I have used the syphon style gun before with good results. Someone gave me the pressure bot blaster or I would most likely still be using the syphon style.

Here's one that has both options: https://www.amazon.com/Stripper-Continu ... B07GW17JFC
1968 Coronet R/T


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2022 4:31 pm
Thank for that info that looks like an affordable option. My compressor puts out 6.2cfm at 90psi. The tool says it needs 7-12. So I guess I could run the compressor at around 110psi or so through the tool. I'm guessing I would only be able to use it intermittently but the compressor will pump up to 200psi so that good I guess. Think this will run the tool ok? Also how does 80 grit aluminum oxide sound for paint and rust stripping? The truck is in a crowded garage with another car next to it. I'm assuming this stuff makes a huge mess right?

Matthew

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2022 8:35 pm
A good compressor is real important if you plan on getting into this type of work.
I would run the PSI on the low end which is 90 according to their specs. This will be much closer to what your compressor puts out. You may need to stop from time to time and let the compressor catch up.

Make sure you have a water separator and filter on your air supply. When a compressor runs a lot, it produces moisture that will condense in the lines and cause you a lot of grief.

80 grit should work since these lighter weight units seem to function better with the finer grit.

The cheaper blast media, like Black Diamond, tends to have a few larger chunks in it that can plug your tip from time to time.
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2022 4:21 am
Using higher pressure with a Blaster will warp the metal use lower pressure as Jim says.
Also do not blast in any one area for to long either as that will tend to warp metal as well.
Dont go strait at panel either blast at an angle 30-35 degrees to the panel.
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2022 6:31 pm
I appreciate the advice guys. Future plans for the shop include a much more powerful compressor. For now I will make due with this. Ill post some pics with the final product.



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2022 6:36 pm
Another question: what do yall think about applying bondo to fill in those areas of pitting in the picture to smooth things out? Then following that with primer? Or is there a better product that wont cost considerably more?



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2022 8:51 am
For small pits, I would use a catalyzed glazing putty. Like "Metal Glaze", or "Icing".
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