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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2015 11:58 pm
Learned this trick long time ago to get runs out after clear has setup. mix up polyester glaze putty, using typical spreader, spread the putty tight over the run and the immediate area and after putty is dry Then grab your wet block an wet dry sand paper an block out your run, making sure your block stays flat. The putty protects the area around the run to keep you from burning through plus works as a great guide coat. Give it a try works great!



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2015 12:45 am
I thought this was a cool trick for a quick touch up. 1k putty and some thinner. Wonder how long it will last or if it will shrink.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 7:29 pm
Never use wax&grease on bare metal, use acetone.



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 5:29 am
ChevyC10 65 wrote:Never use wax&grease on bare metal, use acetone.


huh???
wats the go with this??
ive always been told to use it, also read everywhere to use it before painting over anything
krem



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2015 9:39 pm
One I just figured out recently-when blowing off all the dust from the car from sanding, use a leaf blower instead of your air supply. My compressor is a 5 hp. Home Depot with an 80 gallon tank, which is fine for painting, but quickly runs out of air when trying to blow off a car. Also, in the same vein, use an electric DA type of sander if you have lots of sanding, like stripping a whole car, to do. Finally, prior to painting, empty your water traps, with the compressor running, and let the compressor run until it stops. Then, attach an air nozzle, and let that air out, so that any moisture that may be in the hose is expelled prior to painting.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2015 4:59 pm
krem wrote:
ChevyC10 65 wrote:Never use wax&grease on bare metal, use acetone.


huh???
wats the go with this??
ive always been told to use it, also read everywhere to use it before painting over anything
krem



Just caught this... Yes, its perfectly fine to use a W & G remover over bare metal. Some prefer to use a waterborne remover, but I usually use a solvent based one. Solvent based tends to evaporate faster. ********** Recommends using BOTH! :shock:
http://www.spiuserforum.com/forum/shop- ... for-primer

The leaf blower is also handy for cleaning your shop out. ;) I use one every few months to blow dust out of the corners and out of the rafters.

Here are some tips to help people save materials:

Estimate the amount of material required per spraying session to avoid waste;
Each panel uses approximately 7 - 10oz of mixed material, depending on size, coverage, and material type. I can sometimes squeeze 2 coats out of this, mileage will vary. ;)

If you plan on using material from a gallon over the course of a few weeks or months, it's a good idea to split it into smaller quart containers. This will prevent condensation in the can and spoilage of the materials.
Be sure to mix the materials thoroughly before splitting the gallon to ensure even distribution of color and materials. Storage of materials in a temperature stable environment (within 20 degrees of 68F) will greatly extend their life also, especially activator.

Cleaning paint gun and mixing cups (for non-pros):

When cleaning the paint gun, add a few oz of lacquer thinner, put the cap on tightly and shake the gun away from your face (some will come out of the vent). Empty thinner out of gun.
Add more thinner and "percolate" thinner as described in video below:

Finally, dump used thinner and wipe gun with paper towel.

If you use this method, it will only take a few oz of thinner to clean the gun. I still recommend breaking the gun down and cleaning it thoroughly when done using it for the end of the day. At least you can save some thinner this way.

When cleaning cups, let primers harden in the cup. Squeeze the cup slightly to break the material loose and blow out with compressed air. About 90-99% should come out. You can remove the rest with a lacquer thinner soaked paper towel or new shop rag.
Some paints and clear coats don't work as well for this, but most do. On these types of materials, it can be best to clean the cups while the material is still fresh.



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2015 11:51 pm
Another really good trick, and I've used this one, is to use aluminum foil to cover weirdly shaped parts instead of masking paper and tape. I have used this when painting the underhood of a car, and you are trying to mask wiring, or an air cleaner. Paper and tape won't stick, and foil, if applied tightly, will really hold on. It goes on really fast, and if you are really anal, you can also put a wrap of tape around the foil, just to be safe.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 11:30 am
DEALING WITH PAINT WRINKLE
When you are painting over a car where work has been previously done in another accident. Sometimes the underneath "relatively fresh" paint can wrinkle. A simple trick is to use good quality base coat, and leave it a bit thick with fast reducer. Basically using BC as a sealer. Spray "dry", not wet, blanket coats over the problem area and color sand it to a satin finish with 400-800 grit wet. Repeat this as many times as you need to, to build a protective film. Usually about 4 or 5 blanket coats for me. Patients and soft hands is your friend here. Spraying it "dry" does not give it a chance to get saturated and wrinkle. I use a heat gun to very carefully help expedite the process. You can then spot paint and blend as needed before the clear. Don't worry, it won't bleed through the clear or dye back or anything strange like that.

Paint wrinkling on you when the day is late and you're tired can make you switch from exhausted to very upset. Remember, after you address the wrinkling problem.... If it didn't wrinkle, it's not going to wrinkle. YOU DID IT! Take a deep breath and continue in your usual fashion. It's the difference between your customer driving down the road with a smile today, and you working on it still tomorrow.

I would have no problem doing this to my own vehicle or even at the professional level. It is safe and I never have problems with it. It can save you a couple of hours of work too. A good experienced painter can work though a lot of problems without having to fall back into the body work.

This is one of my tricks. Hope it helps somebody.
GOOLD LUCK!

----NOTICE---
A standard job and show finish are two very different things. This is not a show finish technique.
Vynyard

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2015 10:05 am
^^^^ Excellent tip!

I have one I just discovered which works great for me.

When sanding final primer, I like to break the surface open first quickly with 320 dry on a DA. Of course the pad is very hard and you have to be extremely careful on any curved surfaces so as not to produce waves. A standard interface pad is too soft IMO and hook and loop so my sticky paper wont even work on it.

What I did is take a worn out piece of 3000 trizact stick to a hook and loop DA pad and then that becomes my interface pad for sticky 320. It's just soft enough to handle the curves and I don't have to be so extremely careful with it. I follow up blocking the car with 400 wet on a semi firm block.

Like I said it's just a quicky buzz over to open up the primer and get rid of excess guide coat before wet blocking

Works for me, try it. :wazzup:

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2015 1:36 am
A few I can add that haven't been said already.

Tired of throwing away dozens of saftey glasses or goggles from having over spray on them? Take Novus Plastic Cleaner to them, its basically a rubbing compound for plastics. Takes all the over spray off and makes them like new again.

When cutting and buffing on completes, I like to leave the vehicle masked off until I'm done buffing. (Only do this if you use quality masking materials, water & cheap tape don't mix) Keeps all of the splatter and water marks off all the places they can be a pain to get off.

When buffing, never use the same microfiber from your compound to your glaze.

Keep your spray masks in the bag that they come from, and replace them often.

This one seems like common sense, but I see a lot of novices do this. When working with mud, always re spread past the edges of your first coat of filler. If you just spread an area within your first spread, you're a lot more likely to get waves. ALSO spread your filler as smooth as possible, you'll save a lot of time sanding. I've seen countless guys that spread filler and it looks like they slapped it on with a broom when they're done.

When working filler on areas where you have a sharp body line, fill your body line high. Rough it in, but leave enough to work it. Lay a tape line directly beside the body line the full length of the panel. Then apply a guide coat (I prefer over reduced red oxide primer) and leave the tape on. The edge of the tape should be the crest of the body line. Take your long block and sand your guide coat till none remains. Then run another tape line so it butts up against the first one. Remove first tape line and apply guide coat and repeat. You'll get a perfectly straight body line, this is especially useful on large rear quarters of 50's and 60's cars.
"My vehicles are always dressed in formal attire, wearing a Black Bowtie"
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