Inside doors, hood, trunk lid, sanding

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2020 3:54 pm
So I have the TBirds body stripped to bare metal and coated in epoxy, I don’t have to worry about the body rusting from this point. My plan is to finish stripping the doors, hood and trunk lid. My question is besides the obvious defects and chips in paint. Should the under/insides be stripped to bare metal as well? There’s no rust, and other than sand blasting which can be a mess to get all the grit out. What is the general consensus on possible paint failure if I do not strip to bare metal, make sure it’s scuffed well and epoxy over the existing paint of the inner panels?



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2020 4:12 pm
When I blast out side I generally blast inside then coat with epoxy inside and out.

Getting Blast material out is a Pain make no mistake but its imperative to clean, clean and clean again.
I Cleaned the my Bird project repeatedly and even washing and pressure washing it I still ended up getting blast media come out of a Rocker panel while spraying Epoxy and have to sand it out and reapply in that one spot.
Dennis Barnett
A&P Mechanic, FCC General radio Telephone Operator
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2020 6:53 pm
If you are certain there is no rust, a good cleaning and scuffing the surface to provide scratch for the epoxy will work and probably last longer than we will.

Dennis is right about media blasting being the best way to go about it but as stated it can be a pain.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2020 4:04 pm
I was looking through it yesterday and knowing it’s been hit in front drivers side, if you recall the fender I had to replace (the inner fender well has been repaired) I have to gear my head down from being a “show car” and accept it’s going to be a fun driver. While I don’t want paint failure, I don’t feel I need to be as thorough either. I can get a good scratch on it, as we know the bracing inside the trunk/hood and inner doors have serious curves and crevices that unless I sand blast it’s not going to be easy. I appreciate the feedback, will continue with as planned.



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:00 am
I wouldn't give up on it being a Show car, as it will be a show car no matter what its gonna turn heads and people are always gonna be looking at it with envy.
Just do your best and be happy with the results chock up failures or things that don't turn out to your expectations too learning and redo what you know you can do better on the next try. Yes its expensive and time consuming to redo things But no one said it was a cheap or easy hobby!!!!

None of us turned out a show winner our first attempt or even our 2nd or 3rd!!! Doesnt mean they didn't turn out great or nice. My first car turned out nice BUT was far from perfect, I learned a lot and did worse and better on the next few I did as I learned more and bought better equipment and better materials I learned from my successes mistakes and failures. Its my Successes that drive me and showing them off to others.

Painting any car is a Huge Project Restoring a Car is 100X more than just painting one.
Learning Dent repair. Rust repair. Welding Gas, Mig, Tig each require hours & hours of Practice b4 attempting welds on your pride and joy! Then throw in Proper sanding techniques Painting, Cut and Buff OMG!
To pull off a show winner your expecting yourself to be an expert in each subject.
Its rare that any one is an expert in all subject's or even proficient! each one is a skill that must be practiced regularly or you loose it!

Everyone who gets into this stuff has one thing in mind! Doing it cheaper than the body shop wants to do it! Pulling it off takes skill and dedication. One of the reasons these projects can take years to complete.
Dennis Barnett
A&P Mechanic, FCC General radio Telephone Operator
Line Maintenance A&P Mechanic and MOC Tech specialist.

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