BMW Individual Paint - Sepia Violet Metallic

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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2022 11:49 pm
I bought a bmw individual colour car (custom/rare) and the bumpers, hood and front fenders need a respray. This colour scares me but I’m not sure if it should. I’m
Planning to shoot it through a spray fine 4 turbine set up. The colour looks violet at one angle and greenish metallic at other angles. Images are below. The only place I found the paint online was paintscratch.com in a pre mixed option. I know turbines need slow reducers from all I read. Any other suggestions for how I can make this work or if it I should be any more worried than any other paint.

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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2022 7:29 am
I did see you over in Completed Projects.... in case you missed it....
So you bought a 4 stage I see..... You know you kind of did this backwards.... I mean you should have posted this car/color before even thinking about a turbine system in my opinion, especially a 4 stage. If you are going to try it.... at least get with a "local" paint jobber/supplier. Ordering a color combo like this off the net?.... bad idea....
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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2022 10:06 pm
I didn’t actually buy the sprayfine yet. I was planning on painting my other car with it. I found this car in the meantime and I couldn’t pass it up. I’m having a hard time finding out how it needs to be painted. I do have a friend who has a body shop. I will go see him for advice. All I found online is that it requires a dark grey undercoat.

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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2022 7:16 am
Just glancing over a lookup of the code has the word Pearl right in the name. That would indicate that is a tri-coat consisting of at least that recommended color primer, a base coat color, a pearl coat, and finally the clear coats. Do indeed talk to your body shop guy, if he doesn't advise against you doing this paint I'd be surprised.
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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2022 11:55 am
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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2022 3:16 pm
BMW 474 is a fairly standard blue that uses magenta to move to violet, with a bit of gold pearl for highlight and some Crystalline Frost to give it that milkiness when viewed at an angle.

Needs a VS7 (very dark grey) undercoat but just a simple base coat, clear coat application. As is usual with metallics and pearls, will need normal care to ensure even coverage and so a high quality base would be recommended.
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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2022 8:46 pm
Chris, so a built-in pearl with bumpers, hood and fenders....do you think a novice is going to get this all on right, oh, and with his first time at a turbine system?..... just curious....
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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2022 1:12 am
Honestly Darrel, no I don't. Even a simple metallic or pearl needs to be put on very evenly, to avoid the dreaded tiger stripes and a real novice has little chance of getting this right, without lots of practice.

As for turbines, I've never used one. Thought they were for painting houses, not cars. A colour like this needs light even coats - 1.5 to 2 over the correct shaded primer will give the right effect. Would a turbine be able to do that?

However, I wasn't making a judgement on OP's ability, more just correcting the notion that this colour is a 3-layer, which seemed to be where the thread was heading.
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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2022 3:57 am
NFT5 wrote:Honestly Darrel, no I don't. Even a simple metallic or pearl needs to be put on very evenly, to avoid the dreaded tiger stripes and a real novice has little chance of getting this right, without lots of practice.

As for turbines, I've never used one. Thought they were for painting houses, not cars. A colour like this needs light even coats - 1.5 to 2 over the correct shaded primer will give the right effect. Would a turbine be able to do that?

However, I wasn't making a judgement on OP's ability, more just correcting the notion that this colour is a 3-layer, which seemed to be where the thread was heading.


Highly appreciate the insight. I don’t mind the advice guys. I’m trying to learn. I can definitely find panels to practice on until I feel confident in my ability. I don’t want to run the whole compressor set up because it will cramp my garage space. I like the compactness of a turbine. @darrelk can you elaborate on why a turbine would make this so much more problematic than a traditional paint set up?

I can also just take the panels off and prep them myself and perhaps shoot it the primer with the turbine and sand it up ready for the base and clear and have that done by a pro. Should help with the cost and give me some practice. Please keep the advice rolling. It’s appreciated.

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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2022 10:30 am
Okay, since we don't have a dedicated turbine section here, I'll slightly take this thread off subject but pull it around to my point about turbine spraying and this particular color/effect.
Chris, well, no turbines came into being in this world when the old Kirby Vaccuum cleaners of the 1950s to 1960 came with, of all things, a spray gun attachment. It was a simple thing, just attached to the output of the unit and you could spray many household things, stain lawn furniture, and yes, shoot simple lacquers......hmmmm.... crafty people from other countries took note of these things (in particular the French) and created the first spray systems based on this low pressure (somewhat heated) system. The units were very suited to lacquer spraying as they got rid of any tendancy for blushing because of their warm dry air. A lot of early testing was done by wood labs here in the US and enviromental agencies that showed these units had high transfer of efficiency which is what led to them being the first HVLP systems. This is also where that 10 psi cap pressure limitation came from that evolved from the compressed air HVLP systems.
So, nope, we don't use these to paint houses. Airless (hydraulic pressure, no air) systems up in the 3000 to 5000 psi fluid pressure are used for that here in the US. Wood guys like myself back in the late 1970s figured out we could lay down lacquers better with a turbine system than any compressed air guns of that time. Keep in mind the average Binks or DeVillbiss gun was something like 35% efficient compared to the average turbine system which was at least 82% efficient. My current shop turbine guns are more up around 95% now. The wood conservator/gurus of the time explained that compressed air guns were working on the principles of a refrigerated gas (air) which was being somewhat explosivly released at the gun tip immediately chilling our lacquer fluid droplets while breaking them up and expanding them. These droplets were then thawing as they hit the surface which also introduced "blushing" and a tendancy for dry spraying. If you hit the surface with another quick coat over this still flowing/thawing surface then you got the overflowing, curtains, runs, sags..... With turbine spraying we had less pressure so little to no bounceback, our air was again, warm so the lacquer was hitting the surface as already flowing gobules. It was a "what you see is what you have" with little to no running or sagging of the coating.
So what has changed here over the years....okay, this is like my personal and wood finishing professional take on this..... When guys started to try and use these wood lacquer turbine systems with the newer trend of urethane high solids auto paints..... Whoa, this was not a good fit. I figured this out for myself back in the early 90s when base/clear started coming on strong. We were still in the stone age with air pressures of 4 to 6 psi at most and the "heat" of the turbines was actually detrimental to the drying of urethanes because it was cooking out critical solvents too soon causing poor flow out and just terrible looking finishes. I worked around this with experimentation myself at that time by hot rodding the turbine motors for more speed (changes to bearings, brushes) and also going to heavier commerical application motors. Along with that I went to adding more reducers, using the slowest of the solvents, and chilling my incoming air. I was finally able to get PPG 2021 clear to lay down like glass.....
Okay, so here we are today.... 5 and 6 stage turbines are the "go to" automotive systems with cap pressure up around 9.5 to 10 psi, fairly normal air temp.s, and good redesigned gravity/pressure guns. Keep in mind though.... auto coatings are still designed with regular compressed air system applications in mind. NOTHING shot in a modern car factory is sprayed with a turbine system. Soooo....bottom line..... paints contain solid pieces of pigments, flake, and pearl. A good higher pressure turbine system (WITH PRACTICE) in the hands of someone that knows all of this and has a keen eye can get these special color effects to lay down ALMOST the same as if sprayed by compressed air....but now it's your turn..... we shall see......
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