BMW Individual Paint - Sepia Violet Metallic

General Discussion. Make yourself at home...read, ask and answer!

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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2022 8:32 pm
:goodpost: :goodpost: :goodpost: :worthy: :worthy: :worthy:

Thanks Darrel. I feel like I've just done another unit at Tech College and came away understanding everything you said.
Chris

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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2022 10:04 pm
Chris, well, I'm glad you understood it..... :lol: You still get a lot of head scratching on the subject over here. Industrially these things are past 6 stages now. Those units are in some way be classified as something "other" than HVLP so the 10 psi cap limitation is out the window.
It's funny it was 1980 and our new wood restoration business had been open about 6 months or so. We were still doing hand brushing/ragging of coatings and I was just looking into spray equipment. I grew up around air compressed Binks/DeVilbiss equipment. All I could think about was, "Man, we are going to be going through 5 gallon buckets of wood lacquers like water if we set up like this." So I met a guy at a wood touch-up school that was bragging that he could use his French air sprayer loaded up with black lacquer and you could put your hand next to his spray pattern and not get anything on your hand. Two weeks later I arrived for a "demo" of one of these systems out in Wisconsin. Guys told me to wear a white t shirt and white or light colored jeans. The system was a French Volumaire turbine setup. You actually strapped the turbine to your left side hip and had a 4 foot long hose coming behind your back to the special gun. An extension cord came off the back of the turbine for power. They let me lacquer an antique pressed back chair for the demo. I had NO overspray on me at all and they were using a minimal exhaust fan for the area. Pulled off my mask and I could barely smell anything in the air, just the chair itself with it's new coating..... I bought a system that day and sprayed 15 pieces the next Monday with just a few gallons of lacquer..... I was hooked.....
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2022 11:58 pm
Fascinating. :pcorn:

Is the key to their efficiency just the low pressure or are droplet sizes much larger, so less drifts off?
Chris



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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2022 2:12 am
Deep gratitude for the length of depth to your response Darrel. If I’m understanding you correctly I need a great deal of practice and that’s fair enough. I can look to start with my other car until I get my technique dialled in and then try my hand with this colour if I feel confident. If not I should at least be able to do the body work and lay down the primer. I reached out to a friend who has an auto body business. He is going to see if he can mix up the paint for me. I think I have a solid plan A B and C.

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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2022 8:47 am
So, Chris, it's a combo of physical properties that just matched up to fast dry solvent based liquids. The air stream coming out of the gun is better "shaped" with the liquid gobules being indeed slightly larger and ready to flow. There is just enough pressure to get them to the surface without "dropping." That low pressure gets rid of bounceback off the surface. You spray closer to the surface with these guns (4 to 6 inches is common). Patterns started at about 6 inches wide back in the 2 stage days but with my current 6 stage units you can do a full 12 inches if you need it. A feature of these systems I've not even mentioned is the ability to use the "snap cap" which allows you to just snap the air cap from horizontal, to vertical, to round with one hand and no loosening of the air cap. This also allows you to turn down the air stream (simple flow valve just under the gun handle) so you can do a 1/4 inch round air brush style pattern at about 4 inches off the surface or to shoot that pattern back inside a desk cubby hole system from several feet away. At that distance the pattern becomes maybe an inch wide or so....
So, Mapleridge....yep, that is a much better plan. Get experience with primers and then move on to the more challenging stuff. Practice, practice, practice....Test, test, test..... And yes, you are correct....It is not that you cannot get the same results with turbine spraying. It's just a "learning curve" to figure it out.....
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!

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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2022 4:34 pm
Another great post Darrel. Thanks.

Not too long ago we bought a TV unit to go under a new flat panel that we'd purchased not long before. My wife found a second hand one that was as new but maybe a tenth of the new price so we grabbed it. Minor problem was that it wasn't the right colour to match the other furniture.

Now I've stained stuff before, quite successfully, using the old style methods but decided that, because this unit already had a finish on it, a sprayed on varnish stain would be a better choice. How wrong I was! Trying to get it on evenly was a nightmare - it's not like automotive paint at all.

But, from what you're saying, a turbine system, in the right hands, could probably have done the job. Not suggesting that my hands are, or even might be, the right ones, given lack of experience with the system. As we keep on saying, the right tool in the wrong hands.......
Chris

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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2022 9:50 pm
Chris, yeah, it's kind of cool when you set your turbine gun down with subtle shade mixes. We can go in and highlight gold leaf work for historical frames and make it appear that there is almost a "backlight" effect with carvings. With furniture we do a lot more layering of glazes, tints, and toners for richer looks that don't just come naturally from a lot of woods. The old Thomasville Furniture building plants down in the Carolinas here had 6th generaton craftspeople incorporating as many as 80 steps in their finish production. Back in the "day" they used to print repair manuals that outlined their steps and materials so you could repair their furniture. Bummer though, all that started going off shore to China in about 1978 or so.....
Metal, wood, fiberglass, we work it all... www.furniturephysicians.com We can restore the irreplaceable!



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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2022 10:33 am
Thanks for the detailed explanation! I learned some history today.
As a home guy I would stay totally away from any turbine stuff. It's exactly what you don't want as a small time user.

The turbine system is only used for one thing and then it just sits around taking space. Get a real air compressor and the entire world will open up. So many options and so very flexible. Want to blast? Want to use air tools? Want to paint? Want to just blow off the bench or what your working on? See a one off tool has no other uses. I want all my stuff to be multi-use if possible. It has to be I can't afford all these special one use type tools.

It's tempting because you think this will be simpler/cheaper. Leave them to who ever needs them. None of the top painters I follow use them.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2022 12:05 am
My friend who has a shop told me he can mix up the paint. Appears to be PPG Aquabase as the brand. These were the colours needed:

Medium Pearl Yellow
Opal Frost
Claret
Blue Lake
Fine Pearl White
Jet Black
Permanent Blue
Deep Black

I thought it was worth posting for historical reference. He will mix up what I need if I become brave/competent enough to try to shoot this.
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