Dry spray/over spray fast-curing clear-coat

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2022 11:14 am
OK, so I made a rookie mistake. Without realizing it, I used a clear-coat system (Speedokote SMR-100) with a panel activator vs. a clear/activator system designed for large areas. This mistake was limited to painting my engine bay and interior of the car.

I did have the foresight to spray extra layers of clear on all the top-facing surfaces that are highly visible like the roll cages, transmission tunnel, wheel wells etc. so it really doesn't look bad at all to the casual observer. The problem is the lower surfaces like my floor pan and lower rockers are riddled with dry spay and overspray from the last coat of clear I put down on the more visible spots. Blaming my poor choice of activator, this clear cures ultra fast which makes it great at avoiding dust entrapment for an amateur painting outside like me. However, the over-spray becomes unavoidable since the surface becomes dry-to-the-touch within only a few minutes and the clear builds up like sandpaper and refuses to "melt-in".

From all the reading I am doing, it seems the right way to solve this is to sand and polish the surface. The problem is, there are countless curves, weld seams, and other surface variations that make sanding nearly impossible even by hand. I would quickly burn through to sealer with so many sharp edges.

I do have a clear blender so my thought is to sand any flat area, spray a light mist of blender to soften the surface, then follow with some fresh clear. Obviously I would mask off surrounding areas to prevent the over-spray cycle from repeating.

I thought about just leaving it as-is, but I am noticing the rough surface is attracting dirt and is much more difficult to clean.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2022 12:02 pm
heres what i think i would do, I CAN'T SEE IT so thats why i said, i think. i would rub it with a scratch pad this will remove some of the over spray then you might quickly sand the flat areas that are easily accessible. mix your speed clear with a slow (overall activator) and test it. you might need to use a small amount of slow reducer also. then shoot it on wet, you'll see how its going to work right away. the clear is still going to dry up quite fast. you'll want to watch for run areas, places were you make several passes in the same area the clear will pile up on a corner or somewhere and want to run. it shouldn't be a problem really IF YOUR CAREFULL :rolleyes: as the clear should firm up fast. i don't think a light mist of blender is going to help, maybe a wet coat of it might. it needs to go on wet enough to MELT the overspray.
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Jay D.
they say my name is Jay

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2022 2:24 pm
Yeah, Jay hit it there.... it has to be a WET coat of blender if that method is going to work right. You have to have enough of it on there to move that clear, open it up, and allow it to reflow..... I'd be inclined to do it the first way Jay mentioned and see if that is "enough" to take care of it.....
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2022 4:01 pm
badsix wrote: i don't think a light mist of blender is going to help,


Agree. Blending thinner will help melt fresh clear in, but won't soften hardened clear enough to change the surface texture.

When using speed clear technique is all important. You need to plan the way that you apply so that you maintain that all important wet edge and are constantly spraying in a direction that doesn't create overspray on areas you've already covered.

When I do things like this I plan it in my head first and then do a dry run, going through the actions, without actually pulling the trigger.

As Jay says, a slower reducer can help. A better choice of gun will also make a difference, as will reducing air pressures a little to reduce the overspray. Choose your time of day as well - don't spray when it's hot or in the sun.

Lightly rub it back and have another go.
Chris



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2022 8:03 pm
:goodpost: Jay D.
they say my name is Jay

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