Matching paint colour

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2023 7:11 pm
Im just about to start some spray samples,Ill primer some panels and get a feel for spraying base coat.First time,learned my lesson on primer. Some questions.

Tinting primer,on my gm truck primer is dark grey,my high build is light grey.Should I tint my last coat? Colour is birch silver metallic.

My gun is an odd ball,siphon hvlp with a port regulator.This pressurizes the canister 2-3 psi to help push heavier paint out is what I understand.Also to limit the over spray maybe.
Can this just be removed? I guess what I dont understand is how the hvlp works.Is this something machined into the gun?Or is it the regulator I have that makes it a hvlp?

Ill post a pic.Its a good gun so it should work ,Im not buying another one.



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2023 7:23 pm
Lemmer A 928. Is the gun. Local group here in Canada. I’ll post more info.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2023 7:28 pm
So the reg pushes air into the canister via the hose. So this is supposed to help push thicker paints. So what if I remove this? I could then just a normal regulator at the base.

Can’t find anything about this on the net.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2023 7:32 pm
This is all I can find.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2023 8:56 pm
This is more of a Tools question than a Paint Matching question.

HVLP stands for High Volume Low Pressure. I wouldn't remove anything because you will mess up the gun's operational design.

Like any spray gun, you should set it up on masking paper, to be sure you have the spray pattern, fluid control and air pressure set properly.
1968 Coronet R/T


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2023 11:36 pm
'68 Coronet R/T wrote:This is more of a Tools question than a Paint Matching question.

HVLP stands for High Volume Low Pressure. I wouldn't remove anything because you will mess up the gun's operational design.

Like any spray gun, you should set it up on masking paper, to be sure you have the spray pattern, fluid control and air pressure set properly.

Well I guess what I’m asking is what makes it an HVLP is it the design of the barrel or ?? All I can find is HVLP stands for …..:…. Hard to find detailed info.
Figured if I knew a little more about my gun I’d have a better chance at matching. I’ve bought one rattle can so far. Colour didn’t even match the sample lol. So I think I’ll need to learn to maybe manipulate the colour if that’s possible?

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 08, 2023 4:07 am
HVLP guns are defined in the air passages inside the gun, but most importantly at the air cap. HVLP air caps uae much larger holes in the horns to push the atomised paint coming out of the fluid nozzle into a vertical pattern. Because the holes are larger more air is needed, but at lower pressure, hence the "high volume" and low pressure". Being at a lower pressure there is less turbulence in the spray and therefore less overspray. That means a higher transfer efficiency. But it also means bigger droplet sizes which, if designed and used as intended, reduces the fog of over-atomised paint. Operating a "real" HVLP gun at above the recommended pressures just results in turning it into a fog maker.

RP (reduced pressure) guns were designed to be more efficient than HVLP, making them waste less paint and able to achieve a smoother, flatter finish. Unfortunately the people who jumped on the bandwagon and mandated HVLP in many areas haven't yet realised that technology has moved on and there are better ways (RP and LVLP) to achieve their desired results . Of course many gun manufacturers, especially at the cheaper end, realised that just labelling their junk as "HVLP" was enough to capture a market, regardless of how their guns actually performed in terms of overspray produced and how much volatile organic compound is released into the atmosphere.

If it were me, I wouldn't waste any time trying to 'improve'that old gun. Gun design and engineering is a very complex task and it's just likely that you'd make it worse. Really good, modern design guns are available from $200USD - not worth the time to DIY.

Colour matching is certainly possible and yu may be able to find someone who has the skill and knowledge. Doing it yourself, without that skill and knowledge, can very quickly turn a tin of paint into a tin of slops. You'd need access to, at the very least, all of the tinters that are, or should be, in that colour, plus maybe one or two others if you need to make a bigger change.
Chris



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 08, 2023 9:23 am
Thanks Chris ,well written and easy to understand.

I asked about tinting primer,I have a gallon of urethane high build light grey.Says can be tinted up to 10%. I dont need the whole gallon tinted just maybe 500ml of primer to see what that does.Is it possible to buy?What do they use to tint primer?
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 08, 2023 6:49 pm
are you spraying the complete truck?
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they say my name is Jay

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 08, 2023 6:54 pm
myke wrote:I asked about tinting primer


So you did. And I waffled on about basecoat. :rolleyes:

Most primers can be tinted, up to about 10% of the total volume. The question, though, is do you need to? For most silvers a primer shade that is mid to light grey will be fine. The correct shade is usually given with the formula for the paint colour. For example, I looked up "birch silver" in my system and the formula page tells me that the primer colour is Value Shade 4 (VS4). I don't think that this is necessarily your colour but it's the only one that came up with just the colour name in the search. Often colour names are different in different markets, so a colour code would be necessary to identify it more accurately.

Screenshot_20230309_103404.jpg


However, VS4 is exactly what I'd expect for a silver, unless you were looking for a specific effect. Painting silver over black, for example, makes the flakes contrast more against the darker background while, conversely, silver over white tends to make the flake stand out less. Much more important when doing repairs when the colour needs to match. For complete resprays it doesn't really matter.

Most solvent base tinters can be used in a solvent based primer, subject to the 10% limitation. Obviously you can't use waterbase tinters in a solvent primer and vice versa.

I doubt that you need to tint the primer if it's a light to mid grey.
Chris
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