Clearcoat haze - next step?

General Discussion. Make yourself at home...read, ask and answer!



Non-Lurker
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2023 5:10 pm

Country:
USA
PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2023 5:28 pm
Hello - first time poster but am quickly becoming an auto painting enthusiast. Nice to meet you all!

I recently stripped down, primed, painted, and put clearcoat on my 1992 Chevy S-10. I used an HVLP sprayer and, being an over cautious newbie, I did three coats of clearcoat. There was orange peel, to be sure. I wet sanded starting at 1000 grit, 1200 grit, 1500 grit, and 2000 grit, then changed to Meguiars 100 with a Dewalt polisher with wool pads, then to Meguiars 205. There is a lot of haze throughout with exception of where some of the body panels meet at a curve. Without leading any conversation: this leads me to believe that maybe I was not "aggressive" enough with my wet sanding and 100 and I need to just keep at it but I don't want to start tearing through my clear coat since I am a newbie.

Below is a link to some pictures - any advice is appreciated. I hope to do two other jobs and this was sort of my "tester" case. Happy to provide more info or pics!

https://imgur.com/a/riwm2Io

-Tim in Virginia

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 9854
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2023 12:28 am
Should look like this after 1000 grit using a hard block.
No shiny spots, orange peel or waves:
1000-1500 Grit.jpg
1000-1500 Grit.jpg (16.97 KiB) Viewed 2157 times

You can see where I have started wet sanding with 1500 grit near the bottom of the panel.

Next picture is the panel completely sanded with 1500 grit and starting near the bottom with 2000 grit.

1500-2000 Grit.jpg
1500-2000 Grit.jpg (16 KiB) Viewed 2157 times


Buffed:
Tailgate Buffed 6.JPG


Another way to do it is using guide coat.
Here is a hood completely wet sanded with 1000 grit and a hard block. Cleaned and 3M Dry Guide coat applied before I begin wet sanding with 1500 grit and soft block:
Hood P1500 with Guide Coat 1.jpg


A close up of the 1000 grit scratches I missed on the first pass in this picture:
Hood P1500 with Guide coat.JPG
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31

User avatar

Top Contributor
Posts: 2734
Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 4:46 am
Location: Canberra
Country:
Australia
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2023 8:50 am
One of the difficult things for someone not experienced in painting is to put the clear on wet enough. The usual thing is to hold the gun back a bit too far because you're afraid of runs. The issue is exacerbated by the use of HVLP guns which tend not to atomise really finely, resulting in blobs of paint sitting on the surface rather that finer spots making a smoother, wetter finish.

That usually results in a finish that is slightly dry and certainly, from the pictures, that is the case. In your wet sanding you've knocked the tops off but there's still a lot of texture there.

You could, if you had enough courage, continue to wet sand until the surface is flat, as in 68's photos, but you run the risk of sanding through and even if you don't do that, the final thickness of the clear may not be enough to give the paint the life you expect.

I'd suggest that you go over it once more with P1000-P1200 wet and reduce the texture some more but don't try to take it all out. Squeegee often to check progress. Then wash and Prepsol well, mask it all up again and give it two more coats. Increase the pressure in your gun a bit and hold the gun in a bit closer (about 150mm) when spraying. Thin your clear a little more and make sure that it is at about 25C. This will help it atomise better. Also ensure that your panels are at about the same temperature. This will help the clear to flow out and then the reducer to evaporate quickly.

Yeah, I can hear the "Oh no, not all that extra work?!" but, believe me, it's better than having to start from scratch again. Bonus is that you shouldn't have to wet sand as much and having a bit more clear on there will help it do its job of protecting the base, for longer.
Chris



Non-Lurker
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2023 5:10 pm

Country:
USA
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2023 9:27 am
Thank you both for the responses - I have already put a lot of work into it, so more work is fine with me and I'd rather the clear be thick enough to last like you say. I'm going to sleep on it for a couple of days / accept any more advice that's out there.

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 9854
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2023 2:15 pm
Chris brings up a good point.
3 coats of clear is only enough if you are spraying it correctly.

Another thing to consider is the speed of your activator and reducer. Going with a slower activator and reducer will give your clear a bit more flow time to level out.

This is three coats of clear as sprayed (no cut and buff). You can see it would take very little sanding to get these ready to buff.

ColorasSprayed.jpg


Third Coat of Euro Clear 3.JPG
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31



Settled In
Posts: 36
Joined: Thu Sep 14, 2023 12:34 pm

Country:
USA
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2023 2:39 pm
68, in the pic above would you go straight to like 4000 Grit or 5000 since it layed out so nice or maybe straight to compound and polish?? Sorry OP not trying to jack your thread...



Fully Engaged
Posts: 256
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2023 10:01 pm

Country:
Canada
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2023 8:41 am
Your better off spraying too wet with some runs,Get a practice panel and some good lighting,position yourself so you can see it lay out as you spray.Once you get that feel for speed and distance your set.
Took me a few tries to get it to lay out flat.My first attempt was much like your pics.

User avatar

Board Moderator
Posts: 9854
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2006 12:40 pm
Location: ARIZONA
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2023 3:23 pm
magee84 wrote:68, in the pic above would you go straight to like 4000 Grit or 5000 since it layed out so nice or maybe straight to compound and polish?? Sorry OP not trying to jack your thread...


No, I start with 1000 on a hard block to get things flat.
1968 Coronet R/T


ACTS 16:31



Top Contributor
Posts: 6685
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 7:10 pm
Location: OREGON COAST
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2023 1:00 pm
just a tip here! i have struggled with the buffing procedure for nearly 40 years. my boy and i did a car of mine at the shop he works at, a very hi end shop. i got to talking to one of the detailers and he suggested to try this. block sand with 1000 then 1500 after that use a Trizact 3000 on a 6" foam interface pad on a finish DA. then go to a 5000 Trizact pad one will do a compete small car, you use it wet. the pads are a little spendy and in my area and were hard to buy individually. i found one of my local, jobbers had an open box. after doing this the buffing so easy. i use a compound
DSCN7613[1].JPG
use on a medium foam cutting pad then swirl remover on a polishing pad grab a chair and a cold beer and be amazed. Next time if you know your going to buff ,spray that extra coat of clear on.
Jay D.
they say my name is Jay

Return to Body and Paint

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: badsix, Google [Bot], grump, ohmthis and 60 guests