it seems sometimes you can wet sand metallic base coat

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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2024 12:56 am
today I wet sanded my metallic basecoat.

It's a coarse metallic that lays on thick and a little textured, so I had enough material to lightly wet sand with 1000 grit flat foam pad, followed by gray scuff pad.

After considering this video proving you can wet sand metallics (if you have enough coats) and clear after...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvqK2G0ZcNI ...

I was prepared to sand and respray a layer of base anyway.

I have not cleared yet, but I was curious what clear would look like, so I applied some wg remover over the top to temporarily hide the scuffs in 'grease'.
The dull scuffs shined right up, and putting a bright light next to it at various angles, I can't see the scuff marks?!

The base texture was flattened a little, but the flake reflectivity was still there, and overall the color still looked even to me.

i looked high and low with bright lights at wonky angles and outdoor ambient light, and it looks passable to me.

Am i wrong to think I can go to clear now without another layer of base?

Am I missing something?

everyone on the internet says you'll see sanding marks through the clear, but 1000 wet is just like sanding clear before applying another coat of clear. The last layer of clear hides the scratch
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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2024 7:12 am
Of course you can wet sand base. But only to level out minor imperfections and being careful not to go beyond the imperfection. So, the odd dust nib, bug's leg or similar. I never use anything coarser than P1500 because you will see both the scratching and the exposed flake. I also only do it dry, because water and base really don't like each other and any dribbles of sanded paint will show up later. Maybe you can't see it but to a painter's eye it stands out like the proverbial.

If you really have to sand a metallic or pearl basecoat it's always best to dust another coat over the repaired area.

Don't believe Youtube videos. Too many of them are only put up on contentious subjects to get views from people who don't know. Even a third or fourth year apprentice can tell you that sanding base is generally a bad idea and flushing it with Prepsol is even worse.
Chris



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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2024 11:39 am
if the wg remover has evaporated, am I ok? or did i permanently damage my base?
the base was dry for a full day.

My objective is only to make this car look good from 5 feet away.
My main concern is to have bc/cc layers stick together strongly. That's it.

given these conditions, do I have anything preventing me from spraying clear now?

NFT5 wrote:
If you really have to sand a metallic or pearl basecoat it's always best to dust another coat over the repaired area.



what i'm worried about is dusting creating dry spray or even more texture with metallic.
or if i lay on another full layer, it will look streaky and mottled, and I get another booger which has to be repaired, and I will be stuck in this loop forever.
I actually sprayed a repaired spot 2 days ago, and it made the area darker.

It's a dilemma I'm facing right now. I used slow reducer and applied base medium wet in cool weather, with 1.3 tip, and it was still a little too textured. Maybe this is just what happens with coarse flakes.

so I wanted to knock down the texture a little so the clear could lay a little flatter.
I'd rather not sand too much clear coat and end up with a thinner clear.

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