Using putty to remove drips

Discuss anything after that final masking comes off.



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 9:04 pm
I've been trying various methods to remove drips (sanding with a run blocker, razor blade, nib file). I read about a method that says to cover the drip with glazing putty and then sand it away, leaving a flat surface to buff out.

That seems to be using the putty as a guide coat. If that's the case, couldn't you just use regular guide and accomplish the same thing?

Thanks

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 9:02 am
Personally, I let them hardened a bit and then wrap some 600 grit sandpaper around a wooden block and carefully sand just the run until its almost flush with the surface. Then switch to finer grits until its level.

Tried putting tape over them and sanding through the tape but it didn't work all that great, not sure putty would be much different.

If you use a razor blade and the run is still soft it can actually pull the clear off down to the base coat. It is better to cut the top off the run and let it continue to cure.
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:47 pm
Thanks for the reply.

The clear is quite hard so no chance of a razor blade ripping it open. I flank the run with strips of tape to avoid gouging the surface with the corner of the razor.

I tried the putty method yesterday on a small drip and didn't like it. It forces you to sand into the clear that doesn't really need it (or at least didn't need it until you covered it with putty). I will probably go back to scraping and sanding. I was starting with 1000 however, being too nervous to go any coarser. If you are starting with 600 I'll give that a try.



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 1:10 pm
Raindem wrote:
That seems to be using the putty as a guide coat. If that's the case, couldn't you just use regular guide and accomplish the same thing?

Thanks


somewhat but not quite. the purpose of the putty is to keep the sanding block level ish to what needs to be sanded down. so youd be sanding on the top of the run and going down without sanding on the surface around it. when all the filler is gone the run is gone and the area is flat.
pros prolly dont need to do it like this.theyve done it a few times and have the "knack."
im not a pro.
one thing i do when doing it this way(also do this when changing grits when wet/color sanding. can see the refinement better) is switch up sanding directions after a bit. sand in one direction like//////// then switch to \\\\\\\\\. seems to cut it down quicker.



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 4:01 pm
Any more If runs are very severe I block them down with a Hard block and some 600 to 1000 without hitting Base coat then Scuff rest of panel or whole car and do a Flow coat glory coat what ever you wanna call it BUT being careful not to test Gravity once again.
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 10:51 pm
^^^^^Yeah, another vote for hard blocking with 600. I've got a nice old (old growth lumber prior to 1900) rock maple block. Some times I block down and can just go ahead and cut and buff. Occasionally I'll do a final flow coat as well.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 5:39 am
DarrelK wrote:^^^^^Yeah, another vote for hard blocking with 600. I've got a nice old (old growth lumber prior to 1900) rock maple block. Some times I block down and can just go ahead and cut and buff. Occasionally I'll do a final flow coat as well.


I took your advice a long time ago and Tried it, Sure is a lot faster to knock the runs down than playing around with finer grits till its time too when your trying to take so much off. and If you do hit the Base oh well its not like its really hard to fix.
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