Advice for newbies

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 11:54 am
chris wrote:Before you shoot primer on that car you have to actually RE-APPLY the metal etch treatment and while it is still fresh rinse it off really good with water. Soapy water if you want to go one step further.


Chris - I am a new to this forum and new to auto body as well - am researching on which epoxy primer I should use on my car, I did not hear about reapplying metal etch treatment before, is there any information on this that you can share about epoxy primer and metal etch?

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 5:21 pm
You have to read my answer in context of what that other person was asking -- I believe it was long dormant metal wash he had applied, and the advice was to re-activate it - then wash it off. The basic idea with any metal treatments is to evacuate the metal surface as completely as possible before applying any other material.

Or better yet don't use the stuff at all. I have never had a situation where I needed to do anything other than put tooth into the panel before applying epoxy primer. Why mess around with chemicals if you don't need to...

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:10 pm
To add to the rules for Advice for newbies.
1. Cleanliness is next to Godliness! and Dirt can only come from 3 places: 1. the Vehicle, 2. the Painter, 3. the Booth. Of course there are exceptions to every rule but generally speaking these are the 3 main sources of contamination.
2. Never sit a drink or soda can on a panel that has been sanded for paint unless you plan to sand it again. The sweat ring is contamination.
3. Always read the tech sheets or can labels. Yes paint is paint, and clear is clear, and hardener is hardener, but they may have changed something. I have been painting since the 1970's and I still read tech sheets and can labels. No not every one but if it is a new product "Get Familiar With It"
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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 2:55 pm
chris wrote:Or better yet don't use the stuff at all. I have never had a situation where I needed to do anything other than put tooth into the panel before applying epoxy primer. Why mess around with chemicals if you don't need to...


Well said Chris. If you can avoid using epoxy primer that is the best way to go. Many people go to an autobody shop or on forums and everyone says it's the way to go when that is usually not the case.



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:55 am
I am brand new to painting. Just got a HVLP and looking forward to doing some painting. Once I get all the PROPER prepping done of course. This was an EXCELLENT thread for the beginner to read.

Greg



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 10:43 am
This time of the year it gets humid here in New England. I'm a newbie at paint and body work. Now that the weather is getting warmer I want to get started on some bodywork. My concern is rust developing on a work in progress. How can I keep an item from rusting while I'm working on it?



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:33 am
RaybuckAutoBody wrote:
chris wrote:Or better yet don't use the stuff at all. I have never had a situation where I needed to do anything other than put tooth into the panel before applying epoxy primer. Why mess around with chemicals if you don't need to...


Well said Chris. If you can avoid using epoxy primer that is the best way to go. Many people go to an autobody shop or on forums and everyone says it's the way to go when that is usually not the case.


I don't think that is what Chris was saying. He was stating that more often than not, applying epoxy over clean, well sanded metal is of greater benefit. Issue with all the different types of acids and converters is they can leave a film over the substrate, and if not properly scuffed, cleaned and removed, it will definitely cause adhesion issues with your primers.

I have to disagree with "if you can avoid using epoxy primer that is the best way to go". In the restoration field, you wouldn't want to use anything else. A great, long lasting paint job starts with your undercoats. Why would you want to avoid a primer that seals against moisture and is extremely versatile and durable? The technology has been developed and proven, its affordable and adds extra insurance.... spray away I say!



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 9:34 am
By and large I am pleased with content of the information I have read. It has been 30 plus years since I shot paint. Products, techniques have changed....a lot of great information for the newbie and oldie too~! Cowboy



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 8:00 am
So i'm from South Africa
One thing that us non-US guys might battle with is when you guys use trade names, which is probably only available in the US. Example is "bondo", it took me some time to figure out what this is. If possible of course, use the term body filler to help us out there. Thanx
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